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As Far As The Eye Can See
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The Oil Cringe of the West: The Collected Essays and Reviews of J.B. Kelly Vol. 2
edited by S.B. Kelly
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Sir Walter Scott's Crusades and Other Fantasies
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edited by S.B. Kelly
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Hamlet Made Simple and Other Essays
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Farewell Fear
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interviews by Jerry Gordon
Mohammed and Charlemagne Revisited: The History of a Controversy
Emmet Scott
Why the West is Best: A Muslim Apostate's Defense of Liberal Democracy
Ibn Warraq
Anything Goes
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Karimi Hotel
De Nidra Poller
The Left is Seldom Right
by Norman Berdichevsky
Allah is Dead: Why Islam is Not a Religion
by Rebecca Bynum
Virgins? What Virgins?: And Other Essays
by Ibn Warraq
An Introduction to Danish Culture
by Norman Berdichevsky
The New Vichy Syndrome:
by Theodore Dalrymple
Jihad and Genocide
by Richard L. Rubenstein
Spanish Vignettes: An Offbeat Look Into Spain's Culture, Society & History
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The Iconoclast

Friday, 19 October 2007
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Muslim students at the University of Toronto are not happy with the halal menu offered alongside of the vegetarian and dairy fee menus in the student bar . . . because the bar (it’s a bar for heavens sake) also serves alcohol. They want a completely separate halal refectory.
With a recent vacancy at the campus cafetaria, the Muslim Students Association at U of T Scarborough is once again pushing for a halal-only restaurant, arguing that Bluff 's, a bar downstairs that offers a halal menu, is unsuitable for Muslims because it serves alcohol.
The case is once again spotlighting the thorny issue of religious accommodation for a growing community of Muslim students at Canada's secular academic institutions.
"It doesn't have to accommodate us ... but we're still going to go ahead and push for these things," said Scarborough campus MSA president Emad Alarashi.
Mr. Alarashi does not eat at Bluff 's, even though the restaurant separates its deep fryers, does not use meat stock in its vegetarian dishes and offers soy-based dairy alternatives.
The problem is the booze, says Mr. Alarashi, pointing out that his MSA -- now 500 strong -- has been demanding more halal options for more than a decade.
He would welcome a halal-only eatery, one free of alcohol, but would just as soon frequent a fast-food sandwich shop with halal dishes.
About 20 Canadian universities offer prayer space for Muslim students, including Memorial University in St. John's, the University of British Columbia, Concordia University, York University and the University of Toronto, which has offered part of Hart House up for Friday prayer for 40 years.
From its Web site, where it advises the university's sizable Muslim population, the MSA accuses Aramark, which provides food and catering on campus, of a "halfhearted effort at halal food" and complains that Muslims are denied a "doubt-free halal food option" because of "profit measures."
This month, a former MSA vice-president sparked debate when he decried the halal-certified chicken and beef options at Bluff 's, which is supported by student fees.
Even though Muslims have been eating there since the menu appeared in spring, Ahmad Jaballah said the offering is simply not enough.
"If it was meant to be an accommodation, then it is seen as not befitting," Mr. Jaballah said. . . . compared Bluff 's halal option to a Muslim prayer room dropped down in the middle of a busy corridor. He and Mr. Alarashi claim Bluff 's never consulted the MSA.
Union president and chief executive Rob Wulkan denies that, saying the halal-certified menu was the result of a year's work, including a student survey, informal talks with the MSA executive and Muslim students.
When I was a student we also had controversy over the serving of food in the Student’s Union Bar. The separate hatch serving food, tea and coffee was considered by some to be a sop to sissy girls and those rich enough to afford to drive a car, and inappropriate in a bar, the purpose of which was to supply beer, and more beer, and maybe some lager, then a little more beer, as cheaply as possible.
Times change. 
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Posted on 10/19/2007 2:05 AM by Esmerelda Weatherwax
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Thursday, 18 October 2007
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LGF reports

At Detroit Metro, screeners in Islamic veils are frisking elderly, wheelchair-bound nuns.

Feel better now?

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Posted on 10/18/2007 6:04 PM by Rebecca Bynum
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Thursday, 18 October 2007
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"car rebirthing racket..."
-- from this news article

What a sweet, inoffensive way of putting it.
"My son's in car rebirthing."

As for the judge's self-assured remark that "[i]t's a very sad and debasing thing to hear it suggested that adherence to a religious tenet can justify criminal behaviour," Judge Hampel said, perhaps she should take the occasion of this case to find out what Islam teaches. And what it teaches as not only permitted but commanded (for in Islam things are commanded, things are prohibited) is all kinds of behavior, based on an attitude of unremitting hostility toward Infidels no matter how kindly and welcoming they behave, and inculcates, through Qur'an, Hadith, and Sira, the belief in a permanent state of war (though not necessarily open warfare) between Believers and Infidels.

Adherence to "a religious tenet" -- to tenets, and then not so much adherence as the effect of what may come out of those tenets, the attitudes of Islam, the atmospherics of Islam -- certainly, in Muslim belief and Muslim logic, justifies all kinds of things that non-Muslims would have no trouble describing as criminal behavior, including most importantly, the refusal to collaborate with, or identify with, the authorities of the Infidel nation-state if those authorities are merely trying to enforce laws, and engage in investigations, to protect the continued existence of the legal and political institutions of that nation-state, and the physical well-being of Infidels themselves.

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Posted on 10/18/2007 4:45 PM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Thursday, 18 October 2007
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SkyNews (with thanks to Alan) Dozens of people have been killed in two explosions near to where former Pakistan Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto was being welcomed home.

Ms Bhutto's truck had just passed when the blasts happened in Karachi, only hours after she ended her eight-year exile.

She was unhurt and has been taken to her house but at least 51 people were killed and around 150 others wounded.

An initial small explosion was followed by a huge blast just feet from the vehicle.

Ms Bhutto's procession was heading to a rally near the tomb of Mohammad Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan, when the attacks happened.

Hundreds of thousands of people had lined the route and militants linked to al Qaeda, angered by her support for the US war on terrorism, had threatened to assassinate her...

Update: The BBC reports 108 dead and 100 wounded. The Telegraph is reporting it as "two suspected suicide bombs."

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Posted on 10/18/2007 4:00 PM by Rebecca Bynum
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Thursday, 18 October 2007
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"We knew Snowball could dance great, but we had no idea just how many days he would brighten," the folks at Bird Lovers Only Rescue write in a blog posting devoted to Snowball the dancing cockatoo.

Is this video legit? We have no idea. But it sure is cute.

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Posted on 10/18/2007 3:04 PM by Rebecca Bynum
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Thursday, 18 October 2007
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Thanks for that Hugh - just as the George Formby reminds Mary of the accents of her childhood so My Old Man Said Follow the Van reminds me of mine. My father wasn't big on lullabys so I was sung to sleep and comforted on the best of the music hall. That,  Any Old Iron,  I Like a Nice Cup of Tea in the Morning,  Lily of Laguna and suchlike.

The clip is from a Will Hay film Those Were the days which is available from Amazon.
The Lily Morris website is here.

And on the subject of ukeleles, they are being used in some schools as an alternative to the recorder.

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Posted on 10/18/2007 2:56 PM by Esmerelda Weatherwax
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Thursday, 18 October 2007
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"By the way, in relation to "Little Mosque On The Prairie" you're right in saying that they don't actually have any Muslim actors on that show.."
--- from a posting at Jihadwatch

Of course they don't. Any more than they have Muslims playing Muslims in such movies as "My Son the Fanatic." Hindu and Sikh actors, including some well-known ones, are getting employment thanks to the need for "Muslim" roles to be filled.

Ask yourself two questions.

Why could the character of Apu (the Indian owner of a seven-elevenish store), on The Simpsons, never ever have been made a Muslim?

And why, on The Office (American edition), could the character played by Mindy Chokalingam (reduced for obvious reasons to "Kaling") never be a Muslim, because if that character had any verisimilitude, she would not, could not, be funny, and would leach all the possible humor out of the entire "Office" situation?

In other words, those who produce, those who direct, those who write these shows -- without saying a word -- know perfectly well what the introduction of a real Muslim character, as opposed to a fake Muslim of Bushian or Karen-Hughesian fantasies and espositoish propaganda, would do to their shows.

That says a lot. That speaks volumes. We merely need to turn the volume, on those volumes, up.

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Posted on 10/18/2007 2:37 PM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Thursday, 18 October 2007
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I'm off on my holidays, so no more posting until Halloween. Until that time, I hope NER readers will keep their collective pecker up. Hard without me, I know.

To speed me on my way, here's a song from the First World War:

Goodbye-ee, goodbye-ee,
Wipe the tear, baby dear, from your eye-ee,
Tho' it's hard to part I know,
I'll be tickled to death to go.
Don't cry-ee, don't sigh-ee,
There's a silver lining in the sky-ee,
Bonsoir, old thing, cheer-i-o, chin, chin,
Nah-poo, toodle-oo, Goodbye-ee.

Listen here to the song, performed in 1918 in a clipped, stiff-upper-lipped voice quite unlike mine.

Toodle pip. Back before you know it.

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Posted on 10/18/2007 2:04 PM by Mary Jackson
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Thursday, 18 October 2007
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"Mohamed Zahir Hussain said a minority of people believed that tourism was against Islam..."
-- from this news article

No, not "tourism." The tourists. They are Infidels. They don't behave as Muslims who take their Islam seriously think they should behave. It is not merely their dress, the easygoing and equal relations between Infidels of both sexes. It is the fact that those Infidels behave as if they have a right to their own existence, and own ways, without kowtowing to Muslims, without showing that they understand, with every fiber of their being, that they are inferior to Muslims, and should know their place. That is what rankles and infuriates. Not an abstraction called "tourism." "Tourism" is only the mechanism that brings Infidels to the Maldives, and allows Muslims to see them. Those who take their Islam seriously will offer only hostility. Others will chose to mask or ignore or overcome that inculcated hostility, because they need the tourist dollars -- but that does not make them genuinely "friendly" to the non-Muslims. How could they be?

It's a question between keeping the hostility hidden in your heart and showing it, in the by-now well-known Muslim way, with an explosion, or two, or three.

Why take a chance? Are their no other sandy beaches or balmy bays or palmy days to be found anywhere else? How high must the level of hedonism be to risk one's life while having a good time? Worth it?

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Posted on 10/18/2007 1:49 PM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Thursday, 18 October 2007
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Newsday (with thanks to Alan): Deborah Kerr, the acclaimed British actress whose versatile talent and refined screen persona made her one of Hollywood's top leading ladies in the 1950s in films such as "From Here to Eternity," "The King and I" and "An Affair to Remember," has died. She was 86.

Kerr, who in recent years suffered from Parkinson's disease, died Tuesday in Suffolk, eastern England, her agent said today.

In a screen career that was launched in the early 1940s, Kerr received six best actress Academy Award nominations for her roles in "Edward, My Son" (1949), "From Here to Eternity" (1953), "The King and I" (1956), "Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison" (1957), "Separate Tables"(1958) and "The Sundowners" (1960).

Kerr received an honorary Oscar in 1994 for her body of work in films that also included "Tea and Sympathy," "Beloved Infidel" and "The Night of the Iguana." The award paid tribute to "an artist of impeccable grace and beauty, a dedicated actress whose motion picture career has always stood for perfection, discipline and elegance."

The Scotland-born Kerr, who began her film career in England in 1940 and had been in 10 films before coming to Hollywood to co-star with Clark Gable in the 1947 MGM film "The Hucksters," was the postwar personification of the British gentlewoman.

Indeed, when she arrived in Hollywood after playing a nun in the British film "Black Narcissus," she not only was preceded by her reputation as a lady but for being, in the words of Laurence Olivier, "unreasonably chaste."

But Kerr memorably shattered her ladylike image in 1953 with "From Here to Eternity," in which she played an American Army officer's adulterous wife who has an affair with a first sergeant played by Burt Lancaster...

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Posted on 10/18/2007 1:37 PM by Rebecca Bynum
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Thursday, 18 October 2007
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-- Jew-Hatred in Islam*

by Dr.
Andrew G. Bostom

(* Text of a speech delivered at the “Counterjihad”  conference in Brussels, Belgium, October 18, 2007

Fawaz Damra, the former Imam of the Islamic Center of Cleveland was convicted in 2004 for lying to immigration officials about his links to the terrorist group Palestinian Islamic Jihad (PIJ), and subsequently deported. Yet Damra was touted as a promoter of  interfaith dialogue even after evidence of his participation in fundraising events for the PIJ, was produced, along with a videotape of the Imam telling a crowd of Muslim supporters in 1991 that they should aim “…a rifle at the first and last enemy of the Islamic nation, and that is the sons of monkeys and pigs, the Jews.”  more...
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Posted on 10/18/2007 11:16 AM by NER
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Thursday, 18 October 2007
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Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, right, ducked to enter the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem during a visit Wednesday.

New Duranty: ...On Wednesday, the secretary traveled to Bethlehem, a city hemmed inside the West Bank by the barrier the Israelis have built. Ms. Rice, a daughter and granddaughter of Presbyterian ministers, visited the Church of the Nativity, built on the biblical birthplace of Jesus Christ, where she spoke of her own faith. “I think I could spell Bethlehem before I could spell my name,” she said.

She added that a largely Muslim city like Bethlehem, which also includes Rachel’s Tomb, a sacred site for Jews, was a model for reconciliation....

"A model for reconciliation???" Does she know how the Palestinians treated the Church of the Nativity while they occupied it in 2002, defecating on the floor and using the bible for toilet paper? Does she know Bethlehem's Christian population has dwindled from more than 85 per cent in 1948 to 12 per cent in 2006, and why? Does she know why Christian tourism has dropped off?  And what about Joseph's tomb and the destruction of synagogues under Muslim control? What about the destruction of the temple remains that lie beneath the Al Aqsa mosque and the Dome of the Rock?

"A model for reconciliation."

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Posted on 10/18/2007 9:08 AM by Rebecca Bynum
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Thursday, 18 October 2007
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I thought I couldn't get hold of this, but here it is:

My Little Stick of Blackpool Rock

And here's another:

With my Little Ukelele in my Hand

And another:

Knock knock!
Who's there?
Emily.
Emily Who?
Em a leanin' on a lampost

Leaning on a Lampost

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Posted on 10/18/2007 8:27 AM by Mary Jackson
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Thursday, 18 October 2007
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George Formby cleans some winders. The accent takes me back to my roots:

Click here, chuck

More George Formby here:

Our Sergeant Major

Eee by gum, 'e's a nowty bugger.

Unfortunately I can't get my hands on his little stick of Blackpool rock.

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Posted on 10/18/2007 8:20 AM by Mary Jackson
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Thursday, 18 October 2007
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Thursday, 18 October 2007
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From Damian Thompson's blog (h/t Esmerelda):

The New York Times website is running a “video op-ed” glorifying Iraq’s terrorist insurgency. The film is propaganda, plain and simple: although it has been made by two Americans, it is spoken entirely in Arabic and will be the perfect recruiting tool for al-Qaeda.

Here is the seven-minute film. You really do have to see it to believe it. Little Green Footballs calls it “a commercial for Iraqi terrorists”, and that is no exaggeration.

The film is a sampler for Meeting Resistance, a forthcoming documentary by Steve Connors and Molly Bingham. This is how it advertises itself:

“What would you do if your country was invaded? ‘Meeting Resistance’ raises the veil of anonymity surrounding the Iraqi insurgency by meeting face to face with individuals who are passionately engaged in the struggle, and documenting for the very first time, the sentiments experienced and actions taken by a nation’s citizens when their homeland is occupied.”

I haven’t seen the longer film, but the “video op-ed” is a simple hymn of praise to the Iraqi resistance – you know, the people who blow up civilians with car bombs.

The New York Times site calls the film “Know Thine Enemy”, which is the only acknowledgment that these people wishing to impose an Islamofascist state by terror might be a bit, well, controversial. The video itself dignifies them as “warriors”. It’s a disgusting piece of work.

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Posted on 10/18/2007 8:05 AM by Mary Jackson
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Thursday, 18 October 2007
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New Duranty: BAGHDAD, Oct. 17 — Iraq has agreed to award $1.1 billion in contracts to Iranian and Chinese companies to build a pair of enormous power plants, the Iraqi electricity minister said Tuesday. Word of the project prompted serious concerns among American military officials, who fear that Iranian commercial investments can mask military activities at a time of heightened tension with Iran.

The Iraqi electricity minister, Karim Wahid, said that the Iranian project would be built in Sadr City, a Shiite enclave in Baghdad that is controlled by followers of the anti-American cleric Moktada al-Sadr. He added that Iran had also agreed to provide cheap electricity from its own grid to southern Iraq, and to build a large power plant essentially free of charge in an area between the two southern Shiite holy cities of Karbala and Najaf.

The expansion of ties between Iraq and Iran comes as the United States and Iran clash on nuclear issues and about what American officials have repeatedly said is Iranian support for armed groups in Iraq. American officials have charged that Iranians, through the international military wing known as the Quds Force, are particularly active in support of elite elements of the Mahdi Army, a militia largely controlled by Mr. Sadr.

An American military official in Baghdad said that while he had no specific knowledge of the power plant contracts, any expansion of Iranian interests was a concern for the military here.

“We are of course carefully watching Iran’s overall presence here in Iraq,” the military official said. “As you know, it’s not always as it appears. Their Quds Force routinely uses the cover of a business to mask their real purpose as an intelligence operative.”

“This is a free marketplace, so there’s not much we can do about it,” the official said....

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Posted on 10/18/2007 6:35 AM by Rebecca Bynum
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Thursday, 18 October 2007
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I was disappointed to read in today’s Telegraph that the Science Museum has cancelled the visit of Nobel Prize winning scientist Dr James Watson for his allegedly “racist” remarks:

DNA pioneer Dr Watson, who discovered the double helix with Briton Francis Crick, has been roundly condemned for saying he was “inherently gloomy about the prospect of Africa” because “all our social policies are based on the fact that their intelligence is the same as ours – whereas all the testing says not really”.

[…]

Dr Watson was also quoted as saying that while he hoped all races were equal, “people who have to deal with black employees find this not true”.

He wrote that “there is no firm reason to anticipate that the intellectual capacities of peoples geographically separated in their evolution should prove to have evolved identically.

“Our wanting to reserve equal powers of reason as some universal heritage of humanity will not be enough to make it so."

However, he said people should not discriminate racially, because “there are many people of colour who are very talented”.

Dr Watson was not due to speak about race and intelligence at the Science Museum - this is not his field - so his views on the matter are not relevant. However, his considerable scientific achievements should not obscure the fact that his remarks were not objective or scientific, but merely opinions, expressed in commonplace language. It is one thing to argue that there are average differences in IQ between races, but quite another to justify this by reference not to the statistics but to “people who have to deal with black employees”. Which “people”? Which “employees”? What about black employers, or does their testimony not count because they’re not very bright? Watson is talking off the top of his head here. A scientist is as entitled to do that as the next man, and we should not boycott him or recoil from his views, but neither should we defer to him unless he is talking scientifically.

Some people – Lawrence Auster, for example - feel very strongly about race. This does not make them “racist” - if that word has any meaning - but it may mean that they focus on race at the expense of more important matters.

Watson despairs of Africa. So do I. Many readers will agree that Africa appears to be a hopeless case, and that billions of pounds in aid has been wasted on a continent that simply refuses to help itself. Is this because the inhabitants are black, and therefore have, if the statistics are correct, lower average IQs? Perhaps, but perhaps not. South East Asians (Americans say “Asians”) have, according to John Derbyshire, high IQs, but does this mean that their societies function well? Some do, some don’t. The Chinese embraced Communism, which is one of the most stupid things any society can do. North Koreans are genetically the same as South Koreans; yet South Korea is an imperfect but functioning, productive society, and North Korea is a basket case.

I said falling for Communism was an act of suicidal stupidity, but it is as nothing compared with converting to Islam. Arab societies are violent, backward and dysfunctional. Is this because of their race or genes? Or is it because of Islam? Consider British Hindus and British Muslims. These groups are the same race, yet Hindus thrive here and Muslims fail. The reason: Islam. Islam knows no racial barriers; it drags all minds down to the same level.

 

I am not very interested in race, not because I am politically correct, because race is irrelevant to most of the things I care about. The writer’s colour does not make a mediocre book good – or bad. Racial differences in intelligence affect only averages, not individuals, and individuals interest me more than statistics. “High-intelligence” races are not immune from collective stupidities such as Communism. Above all, any race can embrace Islam, and Islam is the real threat to our civilisation.

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Posted on 10/18/2007 6:05 AM by Mary Jackson
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Thursday, 18 October 2007
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Batman has brains, Superman has brawn, but Mumita has a great kick.
She's part of the superhero cast of "The 99," an Islamic-themed comic book that debuts in select U.S. cities today, including Chicago.
"Every child is looking for a superhero," said Firas Ahmad, an editor at Islamica magazine. "When I grew up, the people from my cultural background were always the bad guys in comics."
Already a hit overseas, "The 99" features superheroes from around the globe using their superpowers to battle forces of evil.
While Mumita the Destroyer relies on her martial arts expertise, Jabbar the Powerful brandishes his muscles. Other characters -- Widad the Loving, Noora the Light, Bari the Healer -- capture superheroes' softer side.
. . . the cast of "The 99" aren't overtly religious. They don't pray or quote the Quran, but promote universal values such as goodness and love.
But each superhero embodies one of the 99 attributes that Muslims ascribe to Allah.
Only a few Chicago stores are carrying "The 99."
Holy Dawa, Batman!
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Posted on 10/18/2007 2:25 AM by Esmerelda Weatherwax
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Wednesday, 17 October 2007
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Wednesday, 17 October 2007
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And by way of reply another biologist and Nobel Prize winner, Rita Levi Montalcini, 98, at the website of the Corriere della Sera, after mentioning the insults recently flung at her (and by implication other Senators for Life), by a certain Italian politician named Storace, ironizes about Watson:

"Una Rita Levi Montalcini serena e ben disposta all'ironia ha aperto a Milano il convegno sulla biologia dei sistemi all'Università Bicocca. La 98enne senatrice a vita e premio Nobel per la Medicina ha scherzato con i fotografi che non smettevano di ritrarla. Letteralmente assediata dai flash, la Montalcini ne ha a un certo punto approfittato per fare una battuta sul recente attacco subito dal leader della Destra Francesco Storace. «Mandategliene copia» ha chiesto ai fotografi riferendosi all'ex ministro. E il premio Nobel non spreca occasioni per ulteriori battute quando le chiedono un commento sulla teoria di James Watson secondo cui la genetica influenzerebbe l'intelligenza e le persone di colore sarebbero meno intelligenti dei bianchi. «Macché genetica - ha detto la Montalcini - è l'ambiente. Il fatto che una persona sia nera non conta niente, il cervello è uguale se non migliore del nostro». E poi, riferendosi al suo grande amico Watson, molto sorpresa ha aggiunto: «È stato lui a dire questo? Io speravo fosse stato uno Storace»

One knows that when she appears to dismiss heredity and to attribute sole significance to the environment -- "Macché genetica - ha detto la Montalcini - è l'ambiente." (roughly "Don't seek such an explanation in genetics -- it's the environment.") -- she surely doesn't mean this literally. But we also know what she would like to mean. She has both the individual  standing in front of her, and social cohesion, such as it is, on her mind; Watson, who likes to present himself (not always accurately, I'm afraid) as a fearless scientist pur et dur, has other things on his.

In any case, the inevitable furor has its title already prepared: "Watson and the Sharks."

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Posted on 10/17/2007 7:25 PM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Wednesday, 17 October 2007
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His hope is that everyone is equal, but he counters that “people who have to deal with black employees find this not true”. He says that you should not discriminate on the basis of colour, because “there are many people of colour who are very talented, but don’t promote them when they haven’t succeeded at the lower level”.  From the article linked here.


I'm all for scientific objectivity, whether on women's mathematical ability or racial differences. However, “people who have to deal with black employees find this not true” is not an objective or scientific observation. It's hearsay.

“there are many people of colour who are very talented, but don’t promote them when they haven’t succeeded at the lower level”. 

Don't promote anyone - black, white, male, female, transgendered or polysexual - who hasn't succeeded at the lower level. This is elementary, my dear Watson.

Don't give up your day job.

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Posted on 10/17/2007 6:51 PM by Mary Jackson
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Wednesday, 17 October 2007
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In this interview in The Sunday Times,

[Dr. James Watson] says that he is “inherently gloomy about the prospect of Africa” because “all our social policies are based on the fact that their intelligence is the same as ours – whereas all the testing says not really”, and I know that this “hot potato” is going to be difficult to address. His hope is that everyone is equal, but he counters that “people who have to deal with black employees find this not true”. He says that you should not discriminate on the basis of colour, because “there are many people of colour who are very talented, but don’t promote them when they haven’t succeeded at the lower level”. He writes that “there is no firm reason to anticipate that the intellectual capacities of peoples geographically separated in their evolution should prove to have evolved identically. Our wanting to reserve equal powers of reason as some universal heritage of humanity will not be enough to make it so”.

When asked how long it might take for the key genes in affecting differences in human intelligence to be found, his “back-of-the-envelope answer” is 15 years. However, he wonders if even 10 years will pass.

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Posted on 10/17/2007 6:25 PM by Rebecca Bynum
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Wednesday, 17 October 2007
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NER's Norman Berdichevsky is interviewed on Hans Christian Andersen's stories for The Book Show.
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Posted on 10/17/2007 4:22 PM by Rebecca Bynum
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Wednesday, 17 October 2007
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No, not quite. It's the Georgian Police. Well, why not? Georgia - the Georgia of Rustaveli not of Gladys Knight and the Pips - has been mentioned here a couple of times. And the Police - the band that rhymed Nabokov with "shake and cough". So why not the Georgian Police?

I love this clip. More Georgian music clips if you follow this link, preferably with a glass of Georgian wine, which you can get in Golders Green, North London. And Georgia:

Georgian Music Video of Police

Garmajos!*

*Cheers!

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Posted on 10/17/2007 4:18 PM by Mary Jackson
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