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Recent Publications by New English Review Authors
As Far As The Eye Can See
by Moshe Dann
Threats of Pain and Ruin
by Theodore Dalrymple
The Oil Cringe of the West: The Collected Essays and Reviews of J.B. Kelly Vol. 2
edited by S.B. Kelly
The Impact of Islam
by Emmet Scott
Sir Walter Scott's Crusades and Other Fantasies
by Ibn Warraq
Fighting the Retreat from Arabia and the Gulf: The Collected Essays and Reviews of J.B. Kelly. Vol. 1
edited by S.B. Kelly
The Literary Culture of France
by J. E. G. Dixon
Hamlet Made Simple and Other Essays
by David P. Gontar
Farewell Fear
by Theodore Dalrymple
The Eagle and The Bible: Lessons in Liberty from Holy Writ
by Kenneth Hanson
The West Speaks
interviews by Jerry Gordon
Mohammed and Charlemagne Revisited: The History of a Controversy
Emmet Scott
Why the West is Best: A Muslim Apostate's Defense of Liberal Democracy
Ibn Warraq
Anything Goes
by Theodore Dalrymple
Karimi Hotel
De Nidra Poller
The Left is Seldom Right
by Norman Berdichevsky
Allah is Dead: Why Islam is Not a Religion
by Rebecca Bynum
Virgins? What Virgins?: And Other Essays
by Ibn Warraq
An Introduction to Danish Culture
by Norman Berdichevsky
The New Vichy Syndrome:
by Theodore Dalrymple
Jihad and Genocide
by Richard L. Rubenstein
Spanish Vignettes: An Offbeat Look Into Spain's Culture, Society & History
by Norman Berdichevsky














The Iconoclast

Friday, 17 October 2014
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He fails to connect the violence, the aggression, the crazed conspiracy theories, the everything to Islam, pur et dur, but the article is still remarkable, not for what it says -- that's obvious to an intelligent non-Muslim - but for the fact that an Arab says it. And his reference to Taha Hussein who saw the problem with Islam just the way Ataturk did (or Ibn Warraq, or Ayaan Hirsi Ali, or Wafa Sultan, or Anwar Sheikh), is a sign that he knows, but can't write directly, about the effect of Islam on its adherents, with the most dangerous being those who take Islam most to heart. Would that he felt free enough outwardly, and possessed the inner freedom too, to see that it is not 'Uruba, Arabness, that is the problem of the Muslim Arab world,, but Islam itself, that explains the many failures, political, economic, social, intellectual, and moral, of Muslim states and societies, and not only Arab ones.

Still, a remarkable article, given its provenance,  here.

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Posted on 10/17/2014 3:06 AM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Friday, 17 October 2014
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Friday, 17 October 2014
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Where Nasser's army, spreading his pan-Arabism, and the Royalists of Saudi Arabia once fought in the mid-1960s,  now Iran and Saudi Arabia battle through proxies, but even this does not adequately describe the permanent chaos of qat-and-foreign-subsidy dependent Yemen, an Arab state without benefit of oil.

Amer Taheri's analysis, of Houthis in the north, Al Qaeda in the Hadramaut, Al-Hirak separatists in the south (in what was once South Yemen), and tribal rulers fighting for their turf all over the place,  here.
 

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Posted on 10/17/2014 2:00 AM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Thursday, 16 October 2014
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We keep being told that the Islamic State has nothing to do with Islam, that Muslims all over the world deplore it, will have nothing to do with it, and so on. But Muslims from all over the world have tried to join or pledge allegiance to the Islamic State, and in Anbar Province, there has been no uprising, large or small, against the Islamic State.

And a story about the possible attack on Baghdad after surrounding villages are taken,  includes this telling paragraph:

If 10 members of Islamic State come, then they will become a thousand, because all the people of Abu Ghraib will join them,” said an Abu Ghraib resident who works as a laborer and declined to be identified for security reasons.

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Posted on 10/16/2014 8:34 PM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Thursday, 16 October 2014
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This is addressed to all British posters or lurkers here who may be or could arrange to be at leisure this upcoming Saturday 18 October 2014, and live within travelling distance of London.  Persons in France, Germany, the Low Countries or Scandinavia might just possibly be able to get there in time, if free.

The British Pakistani Christians will be holding a rally on Saturday 18 October, from 11 am to 1 pm, outside No 10 Downing Street, London, the residence of PM David Cameron, in support of Asia Bibi.  Asia Bibi, mother of five, is a Pakistani Catholic Christian woman who sits in prison in Pakistan under sentence of death because of an accusation of "blasphemy" made against her by her Muslim co-workers some years ago.  Her latest appeal against that sentence has just been rejected, to the delight of many pious Muslims in Pakistan who passionately want her to be killed. 

Some information about the case, and the upcoming protest, here:

http://www.britishpakistanichristians.co.uk/blog/asia-bibi-appeal-hearing-dismissed

 

This is an opportunity to stand up and be counted, to get out onto the street, to visibly declare support for all those non-Muslim minorities who are being mercilessly oppressed and persecuted within Muslim-dominated countries, and specifically, to publicly affirm the principles of freedom of conscience and freedom of speech, in defiance of the sharia of Islam, which denies and intends to destroy both.

Unfortunately, being in Australia, I cannot physically take part in this protest rally but I will be there in spirit.

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Posted on 10/16/2014 7:28 PM by Christina McIntosh
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Thursday, 16 October 2014
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Lars Hedegaard, President of Danish and International Free Press Societies

Source: International Civil Liberties Alliance

 

Yesterday, we posted on the news that  “BH”, the attempted assassin  of  Lars Hedegaard   President of the Danish and International Free Press Societies  had been released by Turkey  in an exchange of Jihadists for Turkish diplomats.  “BH” had been arrested by Turkish authorities at Istanbul Airport in April 2014.  He was  alleged to have been employed in airport security in Denmark.  We sent Hedegaard questions about these developments. In the midst of a hectic day in Copenhagen he found   time to respond about the current circumstances and predicament he continues to face as an outspoken defender of free speech and critic of Islam.

Gordon:  Was your assailant “BH” arraigned by Danish Police following his attempted assassination of you?
 
Hedegaard: 
He was not arraigned by the Danish police but is believed to have escaped from Denmark on the day of the murder attempt, i.e., February 5, 2013.

Gordon: To your knowledge how was “BH” able to travel to Turkey?
 
Hedegaard: 
I don’t know if he went straight to Turkey. Before his arrest in Istanbul Airport in April this year, he had been moving between Turkey, Syria and Iraq. I believe he must have had helpers that got him out of Denmark.

Gordon:  Was “BH” released by Turkey as part of the exchange of Jihadists for 49 Turkish Diplomats and their families held captive by ISIS after the fall of Mosul?
 
Hedegaard: 
That is widely believed, not only by me but by most Danish politicians. But despite many official requests, the Turks have declined to provide answers. The Danish government doesn’t even know if he has been released. All we know is that he cannot be contacted.
 
Gordon: 
How many Danish citizens are known to have joined ISIS?
 
Hedegaard: 
More than one hundred.

Gordon:   Can their return to Denmark be prevented?
 
Hedegaard:   Yes, if the government wanted to. But it doesn’t.

Gordon:   Have you received any recent threats on your life by Muslim extremists in Denmark or the EU?
 
Hedegaard: 
No.

Gordon:   Besides Geert  Wilders ‘ Hague Parliament  questions to the Dutch Foreign Minister, who in Denmark’s Parliament  has come to your defense?
 
Hedegaard: 
This morning there was a parliamentary hearing with our justice and foreign ministers. All parties from left to right came out in my defense and expressed their disgust with Turkey.

Gordon:  Has Turkey violated the EC extradition treaty with the release of “BH”, and what recourse does Denmark have for his apprehension?
 
Hedegaard: 
Turkey certainly has violated a European treaty on extradition, but Denmark can do very little.

Gordon:  Has the rise of the Danish People’s Party following the European Parliamentary Elections of May 2014 had any impact on Denmark’s mass immigration, multicultural policies and hate laws under which you have been prosecuted?
 
Hedegaard: 
Not so far but it appears that the leftist government is getting nervous. The Danes don’t like it.    

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Posted on 10/16/2014 5:20 PM by Jerry Gordon
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Thursday, 16 October 2014
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The Higher -- not that much higher -- Banality, for Fall 2014, from the President of Harvard University.

Here.

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Posted on 10/16/2014 5:18 PM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Thursday, 16 October 2014
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Posted on 10/16/2014 10:21 AM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Thursday, 16 October 2014
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Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Foreign Minister John Baird are certainly correct to support Canada’s traditional allies in attacking the Islamic State of Iraq and Al-Sham (ISIS). It is such an unspeakably odious organization that it is beyond normal political discourse and as many as possible of its active adherents should be killed or otherwise eliminated as quickly as possible. Further, anything that seems to reactivate the Western Alliance, the most successful in world history, is a good thing. It has recently fallen to a somnolent condition even less fearsome than the former “coalition of the willing,” i.e. we’ll do it if we’re threatened ourselves but otherwise we’ll just be happy with a U.S guaranty of our national security. There cannot be any debate that the Islamic State is a sociopathic, genocidal, barbarous outrage to any concept of civilization, and should be physically exterminated. Some effort should be made to reorient surviving prisoners rather than simply executing them, but it is the duty and in the self-interest of all countries to apply the most ruthless and expeditious force available to eliminate this unmitigated evil. It is to the credit of the Green party that its MP, Bruce Hyer, voted with the government, whose motives were perfectly sensibly explained by Messrs. Harper and Baird.

Disappointing, but not surprising, was the position of Thomas Mulcair, leader of the official opposition, that bombing merely created more volunteers to the Islamic State so the effort was counter-productive. This was the same person who advised us to repeal the Clarity Act and agree to the independence of Quebec if 50% plus one voted for a vague separatist question, while also promising to ban English from federal government workplaces in Quebec to convince French Quebec that it didn’t have to secede to survive culturally, and that this policy was the true way forward for federalism. At least Mr. Mulcair is consistent: We must appease anyone who threatens us and preen our feathers for humanitarian broad-mindedness as we do so. As recent Quebec elections have demonstrated, appeasing Quebec’s separatists assures their success and confronting them fairly with the facts and consequences of enactment of their plans secures their democratic defeat. And to assert that bombing the IS will cause more volunteers to join it is like saying the more Nazi soldiers and airmen we killed in Second World War, the more we faced. That is not how war works, Mr. Mulcair. When dealing with a mortal enemy, you can count all those susceptible to join his ranks as enemies from the start and the more you kill, the fewer remain.

Not even these Muslim terrorist mutants can multiply faster than modern military technology can dispose of them, and air attack, while not the whole solution, is so precise, it can severely interdict and constrain terrorist insurgencies lacking broad popular support. Whatever the unimaginable attractions of the Islamic State, it still has only about 20,000 known adherents and has run out of much of its steam already; the appeasement of such a group would be the ultimate degradation and shame of the West. There would be no need to behead individual Western captives; as a society, civilization, and epoch in world history, we would have thoughtfully decapitated ourselves. This is the prescription of the leader of the official opposition.

Not as outrageous but also vacuous is the position of the Liberal party, which is that we should side-step the military effort and by unspecified means distribute humanitarian aid to refugees “tucked up” at the Syrian-Turkish border, as discontent in this unfortunate group will be a greater threat to the West and international security than the ISIS. This isn’t a zero-sum game and since you don’t need warplanes and sophisticated ordnance to assist homeless refugees, both can be done simultaneously and this is the course being followed by the Western Alliance, including Canada. Listening to Liberal spokesman Gen. Andrew Leslie (a descendant of the artillery commander at Vimy and commander of the Canadian Expeditionary Force in Europe from 1940 to 1943, General A.G.L. McNaughton, and of post-war defence minister Brooke Claxton), stumble through this flummery on television was a distressing experience.

This response to IS is not a responsible position and is only explicable by the perceived need to pander to Quebec isolationism. Quebec has been cool to every war that was not necessitated by the defence of Canada, i.e. all since 1815, except the Korean War, where the anti-communist fervour of the time, in the piping days of Pius XII, caused Quebecois to be even more militant about hammering North Korea and “Red China” than English Canadians. The Liberals under their current leader’s father and others have led the successful fight on the federalist side in Quebec, and the Liberals should now reintroduce that province to the concept of the pan-Canadian interest and not try to out-pander Mulcair in flattering Quebec’s ancient penchant for parochial insularity.

What Canada does in the Middle East, no matter how well targeted, is a small piece of the puzzle. All the Canadian party leaders, and other national leaders in allied countries, are correct that this isn’t a question for the large scale insertion of our combat troops. Boots on the ground has become an anathematic catch-word, because the United States has become war-wary after being mired for four of their five wars since 1945 (Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan, but not the Gulf War), in prolonged conflicts with no exit strategy. Korea was at least somewhat successful, as South Korea was protected and has become a great political and economic success story, though North Korea continues to bedevil the world to this day. The take-away message from these disappointments should not be an irrational abhorrence of using ground forces, much less a Mulcairian fear of raising a hand in anger of any kind against anyone, lest their numbers multiply in resentment, but to define the alliance interest in terms where the practical meet the essential, and get all allies or even cordial non-allied states to sign onto it, and hold that line.

That was essentially the basis of the successful containment strategy in the Cold War. In the Middle East, we are paying a heavy price for dismantling the Ottoman Empire along artificial lines; for the British promise of what in 1917 was called Palestine to the Jews and to the Arabs simultaneously; for the failure to act on the impulse of U.S. President Nixon and Soviet President Brezhnev in 1973 to agree and impose a settlement on Arab-Israeli claims when the super powers still could; for President Carter’s encouragement of the overthrow of the Shah of Iran; and for Europe’s repeated rejections of Turkish efforts to achieve a closer association with the European Union.

We are where we are. The best that can be done now is to set up an action group of several of the major Western or pro-Western powers and try to explore what would be necessary to secure Chinese and Russian co-operation, both countries with internal terrorist problems, to stop playing footsie with the nuclear-fixated Iranian ayatollahs. We could then jointly put all the negative and positive pressure appropriate on Iran to suspend seriously its nuclear program, and then encourage a division of the Middle East into spheres of influence for Iran, Turkey, Egypt and Saudi Arabia. Israel, Jordan (a Palestinian majority governed by Bedouins) and Lebanon (a Christian-Muslim divided country) should be carved out as special cases, Middle Eastern Switzerlands.

Eventually, there will have to be some boots on the ground to make any sense out of Iraq and Syria in particular, but they should be Islamic boots. The West can’t occupy these countries and they can’t be too choosy about how they are governed. The Turks, Egyptians, and Persians have, in their past (and in the case of Turkey, not just in the mists of antiquity) some vocation to rule that area. We should try to unite the European Union, Russia, China, Japan and the North Americans to encourage them and the Saudis to rediscover that vocation. In the meantime, the West should supply the cutting edge to subduing Islamic State; on this, the government deserves our support.

First published in the National Post.

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Posted on 10/16/2014 8:44 AM by Conrad Black
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Thursday, 16 October 2014
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Posted on 10/16/2014 8:37 AM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Thursday, 16 October 2014
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During Wind and Rain

They sing their dearest songs—
He, she, all of them—yea,
Treble and tenor and bass,
And one to play;
With the candles mooning each face ...
Ah, no; the years O!
How the sick leaves reel down in throngs!

They clear the creeping moss—
Elders and juniors—aye,
Making the pathways neat
And the garden gay;
And they build a shady seat…
Ah, no; the years, the years;
See the white storm-birds wing across!

They are blithely breakfasting all—
Men and maidens—yea,
Under the summer tree,
With a glimpse of the bay,
While pet fowl come to the knee…
Ah, no; the years O!
And the rotten rose is ript from the wall.

They change to a high new house,
He, she, all of them—aye,
Clocks and carpets and chairs
On the lawn all day,
And brightest things that are theirs…
Ah, no; the years, the years;
Down their carved names the rain-drop ploughs.

                                                         Thomas Hardy

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Posted on 10/16/2014 8:23 AM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Thursday, 16 October 2014
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The quiet, but relentless, dismemberment of Aslan can be found here.

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Posted on 10/16/2014 8:10 AM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Thursday, 16 October 2014
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Posted on 10/16/2014 7:40 AM by Rebecca Bynum
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Thursday, 16 October 2014
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Here.

The Shi'a of Saudi Arabia are, unsurprisingly, treated badly by the Uber-Sunnis, the Wahhabis, who rule the roost in Riyadh. And they live in Asir, the Eastern province where all of Saudi Arabia's oilfields are located. They see the oil fields; they know the revenues that the Al-Saud arrogate to thsemselves; they'd like a share. And the kind of "corruption in the land" they oppose is the ordinary, Western kind of corruption -- that of the Al-Saud princes and princelings and princelettes, and their courtiers.

The death sentence handed down to this Shi'a cleric will, if carried out, mean trouble in Asir for the Al-Saud, who already must worry about Houthi successes in Yemen.

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Posted on 10/16/2014 7:01 AM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Thursday, 16 October 2014
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The wobbling of the stock market, jitters about deflation in Europe, and the sharp decline in the price of oil have raised renewed doubts about the believability of the economic recovery from the tremendous strains of 2008 and 2009. These were inevitable after the official response in the United States was to increase the accumulated national debt of the country from $10 trillion — where it had arrived, in 2009, after 233 years of American independence — to $18 trillion less than six years later. And something like a third of that additional debt was not sold at a yield that met the free-market test of attracting arm’s-length buyers voluntarily on the basis of fair value and the risk-reward ratio. Rather, the Federal Reserve, a 100 percent subsidiary of the U.S. Treasury, “bought” the unsold bonds and paid for them, not in cash that the government could use to pay its expenses that created the deficit, but in Federal Reserve notes that were largely swapped to banks for cash. Many of these banks had the cash to swap because of funds advanced at the height of the financial crisis to ensure liquidity. The fact that most of this cash is still sitting in those formerly distressed or at least unstable banks, despite six consecutive years of almost negligible interest rates for substantial borrowers, indicates the lack of confidence on the part of borrowers and lenders in overall economic conditions. The fact that Berkshire-Hathaway has more cash on hand than ever in its history — $55 billion — may be taken as an indication that Warren Buffett, despite his noisy support of the administration, is sitting on his hands and his money-bags waiting for a descent of equity values. (And much of the stock-market rise has been caused by softness in most of real estate and low yields on other instruments because of the government’s ambition for low interest rates to avoid an even more stupefying rise in the deficit.)

As I have written here before (and many others have made the same and similar points) it is not surprising that there is a lack of confidence in the reliability of a recovery that has required the infusion of $8 trillion in six years, in debt that in fact has most of the characteristics of a straight money-supply increase, and that in earlier times would have been described as “printing money.” This is the classic formula for inflation: simply increasing the amount of money in circulation (including assets that can be easily liquidated, such as bank deposits), in no relationship to productivity increases. The other traditional method of inflation is cost-push increases in the cost of everything: an overheated economy. What we have — massive deficit financing, so extreme that the bond markets won’t take it voluntarily, coupled with spurious debt issues that are really just running the presses — is far more dangerous, as it is the result of an under-heated economy and is an attempt to generate demand. Cost-push inflation has too much money chasing too few goods and services, forcing their price up, and what is then called for is a reduction in demand to prevent an inflationary spiral, which can be done comparatively easily, though it is painful to many (usually achieved by just raising interest rates).

Now, corporations and serious people will not borrow even at 2 percent, because they do not believe in the prospects for genuine economic growth, i.e., a benign cycle of increasing production to fill spontaneously increasing appetites for more goods and services. What we are getting has many of the characteristics of stagflation, as at the end of the Carter era (1978–81), when the United States was at or near double-digit inflation and unemployment, and interest rates were hoisted up to over 20 percent to cool out demand. The Reagan tax cuts and defense-spending increases that followed were accompanied by and encouraged an era of rapid technological advances that spurred sharp productivity increases. Even though millions of jobs were eliminated as obsolescent to the modernized manufacturing and service industries, or inadequately remunerative to American workers and better filled by cheap-labor countries, a net 18 million jobs were created in six years. Organized labor and the left wing of the Democratic party screamed like banshees that all the new jobs were for hamburger flippers, pizza deliverers, or people taking in dry cleaning, but most of the new jobs were related to new applications of advanced technology.

Today, inflation is significant at the basic level of food and other necessities of life, and very strong in the high end of luxury goods: couture, deluxe automobiles (which can now cost up to $1 million), highest-end residential real estate, fine jewelry, and the art market. The majority, who make less than $250,000 per year, and to whose welfare the present administration claims to be fervently attached, is under great strain: Unavoidable costs like the price of milk or of university education are rising quite crisply, but incomes are not.

I believe the sluggishness that is evident is the result not merely of incredulity that the vast federal borrowing and creation and disgorgement of money is really a solution. It is also, rather, the result of the evolution of an economy in which too little that is really saleable or even desirable is produced, and too much of the labor force is mired in parts of the service industry that add little value. It isn’t just that there are too many lawyers and stockbrokers and not enough plumbers and mechanics. Ultimately, a society cannot become more prosperous if value is not being added to its economy by an adequate number of employed people. Any extractive and transformative industry adds value, and so do some service industries, but much of finance, consultation, and the operation of the vast civil legal apparatus is just the velocity of money. With the increasing sale of intangible services, by lawyers, consultants, and other specialists, has come the resurgence of the merchant banks, which is based on companies’ buying other companies, a process that is generally financed by borrowings or issues of stock or corporate debt and by administrative efficiencies of the enlarged company. The process generates huge commissions to the advisers; the shareholders of the target company are enriched and other investors or lenders finance the transaction, but it is all just the velocity of money: Nobody is adding any value to anything, apart from the company making the takeover, which becomes a stronger competitor in its field (though many of these takeovers prove to have been bad deals, over-priced and not really affordable).

Two weeks ago, I wrote here of the fallacy of the Keynes theory that there was a natural balance in the economy in which there would be minimal inflation and unemployment, and of the Hayek theory that any government intervention in the economy was bound to have negative effects. There is no such balance as Keynes claimed and there never was, and, while Hayek is deservedly an eminent philosopher of individual liberty, it is neither possible nor advisable for governments to fold the welfare system completely or be too neglectful of national defense, including defense-production industries. What the knowledgeable markets are waiting for is a soft landing to the U.S. debt binge and a comfort level that the economy is on a sound footing.

There are, to be sure, some optimistic signs: The progress toward American energy self-sufficiency is clear and inexorable, as long as the authorities are steeled to the more nonsensical keenings of the eco-extremists; and the declining oil price inconveniences the countries that bankroll terrorism, and the Russians. Manufacturing is gingerly returning to the U.S. and the talent and quality of the unprecedentedly productive American work force is undiminished. The number of self-employed, living quite successfully by their wits, such as day traders and specialized craftsmen, is increasing steadily.

But what is needed is preemptive modernization. Obviously, the vast physical establishment and bloated personnel cadres of universities will have to stop. Tuition is $20,000 to $60,000 per student per year: It is unsustainable, it has created another debt bubble, of student loans, and most of the university process is on its way onto the Internet. Many thousands of relatively sophisticated jobs will vanish and vast and portentous edifices will be left in Ozymandian disuse.

Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin has led the way in curbing public-sector unions. The right to strike should be banned everywhere in the public sector, and all these retrograde, Luddite public-sector unions should be decertified. We should have tax policies that raise the tax on elective spending, and reduce personal and corporate income taxes, in proportions that seriously shrink the deficit; and encourage the return of manufacturing and of oil and other natural-resources production. Defense spending is the best form of economic stimulus, and the cuts in it should stop, though the spending might be apportioned more effectively.

Drastic measures should be taken to consolidate laws and reform the rules of practice so that fewer cases are receivable and the courts function better. I will not subject readers to another airing of my views on the need for a radical revision of the country’s disgraceful criminal-justice system, but the needless squandering of millions of lives in false convictions and over-sentencing must stop. The corrupt fraud of the War on Drugs must end: Legalize all of them but require treatment for hard-drug users. There are better and cheaper ways to punish nonviolent offenders than by imprisonment.

Capitalism is the best system because it best responds to the universal desire for more. But what we have now is a system that has become so contorted by special-interest groups and venal politicians that it doesn’t work very well. The mighty garden of the American economy must be allowed to grow, and jobs will be created where they are needed by free-market criteria, not the antlike encroachments of the legal cartel and the gluttonous engorgement of the stock-jobbers (in Jeffersons phrase, misapplied to Hamilton) and asset-strippers. Financial engineering is necessary and can be artful; gaming the system is not bad but it doesn’t strengthen it. The mere velocity of money makes us dizzy, not strong, and redundant transactional activity within the economic marketplace should not be tax-favored. Pure capitalism must be reaffirmed, including by not over-iconizing, at least in fiscal concessions, the brazen golden calf. Let America be America; confidence will return and prosperity will spread.

First published in National Review.

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Posted on 10/16/2014 6:03 AM by Conrad Black
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Thursday, 16 October 2014
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The key breakthrough involves using a “magnetic bottle” to contain the vast amount of heat. See here.

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Posted on 10/16/2014 5:55 AM by Rebecca Bynum
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Thursday, 16 October 2014
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Here.

As the Kurdish reporter notes, the Kurds -- Sunnis for the most part, but not Arabs, and thus possessing an ethnic identity that works against, rather than reinforces, Islam -- with old weapons have held out for a month, while the Arabs of the Iraqi military in Mosul, well-outfitted with the latest American weaponry, fled the forces of the Islamic State in one day.

 

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Posted on 10/16/2014 5:53 AM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Thursday, 16 October 2014
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A Daniel come to judgment, in a lawsuit filed by relatives of six of the 241 Marines killed in Beirut in 1983 by Hezbollah operatives working for Iran, here.

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Posted on 10/16/2014 5:47 AM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Thursday, 16 October 2014
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From The Investigative Project, here.

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Posted on 10/16/2014 5:40 AM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Wednesday, 15 October 2014
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As reported by AAP and by Andree Withey for the ABC.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-10-15/logan-man-killed-fighting-for-is/5815142

'Queensland Islamic State Fighter: Brisbane Council Worker Zia Abdul Haq Killed After Travelling to Syria".

And the first thing, predictably, that we are told is that his family is shocked! shocked! - CM

'The family of a former Brisbane City Council worker killed after travelling to Syria to fight for the terrorist group Islamic State (IS) is in shock, the Islamic Council of Queensland says.

A council worker.  Now, although that may conjure up images of blokes in hard hats filling in holes in the road, spreading bitumen, toting rubbish bins, mowing grass in parks or trimming trees, another report says he was a "finance worker".  That suggests white-collar desk job.  And if one knows the least bit about Islam, the vision of a jihad-minded devout Muslim sleekly-besuited behind a desk in the City Council of an Infidel state, with access to matters financial, does not make for quiet sleep. - CM

'Council president Mohammad Yusuf said he had spoken with family members of Afghan-born Logan man Zia Abdul Haq.

Afghan-born, temporarily-Logan-resident Muslim man. - CM

'Mr Yusuf said he was unaware the 33 year old had joined IS militants.

But were others?  And Mr Yusuf may have known that Mr Haq was off to the jihad, without having been told in so many words which particular jihad outfit he intended to join.  By the way, note the age. 33.  That is not some headstrong teenager. That is a fully adult man; and educated and English-literate to boot (or he could not have got the desk job in "finance". - CM

'IS has committed mass atrocities in Syria and Iraq, including killing prisoners (just as did Mohammed and his Companions back in the day - CM), recruiting child fighters, and according to the group, capturing women and children as spoils of war.

Treating women and children as spoils of war has been a major feature of Muslim Jihad from the time of Mohammed all the way through to the present day.  That phrase 'according to the group' is peculiar; does the reporter who wrote it mean to suggest that there is some doubt that this capturing and sex-slaving and so on, is not in fact happening, that the Islamic State jihadis are claiming to have done something they have not?  But the evidence that they have seems to me to be overwhelming. - CM

'Abdul Haq was killed during the conflict on October 3, The Australian newspaper reported.

Good riddance.  One less dangerous jihad-minded Mohammedan in our midst; so long as the report can be confirmed. - CM

'He lived in Logan, south of Brisbane, with his now ex-wife (is she Muslim or non-Muslim? - CM) and son, before travelling to Syria to join IS.

'Abdul Haq migrated to Australia in his 20s (which, given that he turned 33 this year, would time his entry to Australia either just before, at the time of or just after the massive Muslim ghazi assault on the USA on September 11 2001; an assault - waged by infiltrators - that should have been followed - but was not - by a ban upon all further entry of declared/ identifiable Muslims into the West. - CM) and at one point attended the Holland Park Mosque, in Brisbane's west.

"At one point".  Note the attempt to minimise any connection between that mosque and this man and what he did. - CM

'He was a shy person, mosque spokesman Ali Kadri told the AAP news agency.

Oh, they're always "shy" and quiet and reserved and wouldn't-hurt-a-fly. Or they're "decent fellows".  Or else they're smiling and happy and have lots of Infidel friends.  And nobody, but nobody, ever had a clue that one day they would set out to wage jihad fi sabil allah, just like it says in the Quran. - CM

"He was here for 10 years and went away last August", he said.

Ten years, eh?  Every Friday?  More than once a day?  Other days of the week as well?  Or did he just show up a couple of times a year, for the two Eid festivals?  How often did this Afghan-background Muslim man attend "prayers" at this little mosque in suburban Brisbane, Queensland, Australia?  I hope ASIO and the AFP are conducting inquiries.  The mosque should be investigated. Thoroughly. The very obvious attempts to deflect attention from the mosque, to minimise Abdul Haq's connection with the mosque, should be a cue to focus attention upon the mosque, unrelentingly. - CM

'He said Abdul Haq did not speak of his plans before disappearing.

But he might have written about them...that's not "speaking".  And... it depends what you mean, precisely, by "plans".  This carefully worded statement doesn't exclude the possibility that Mr Ali Kadri knew full well that Mr Haq was off to the jihad, but that he didn't have possession of the precise intended itinerary with maps, etc. And, furthermore, this statement doesn't exclude the possibility that Mr Haq communicated with home base after "disappearing".  When listening to people like Mr Ali Kadri, who is in full Damage Control mode, doing his level best to Protect Islam - and the Ummah advance bases in Australia - from ever-more-suspicious Infidel scrutiny, one must learn to parse their words very, very carefully, keeping an eye open for potential double meanings and loop-holes. - CM

'Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said the Government was aware of the reported death, but it had not yet been confirmed.

Let's hope it can be.  I do most sincerely hope that he is dead. Just one less dangerous jihad-minded mohammedan to be a menace to his hapless infidel neighbours in Australian suburbia. - CM

"As Australia did not have a diplomatic mission in Syria, the Government's capacity to verify the report was limited", Ms Bishop said in a statement.

"I cannot confirm on grounds of privacy whether the individual's passport was cancelled on the basis of security concerns."

Nice job of stonewalling.  Let's hope that it was cancelled, and cancelled after it became manifest that he had departed from Australia en route to wage jihad with Islamic State.  That is the time to cancel passports of such persons as are found to be thinking of Jihad abroad; after they go, not before.  Let them deport themselves; then cancel their passports, to make sure that, supposing they do not meet a sticky end in Syria or Iraq or wherever else in the hell-pits of dar al Islam they have gone, they cannot return into the lands of the non-Muslims to wage jihad here. - CM

'Last month police officers raided a Logan Islamic centre and charged a man (a Muslim man - CM) with allegedly recruiting, facilitating and funding people (that is, Muslims; the eager recruits for jihad who are trotting off to Syria to engage in or connive at bombings, beheadings, torturings, and a spot of kidnapping, raping and sex slaving - by way of pious imitatio Mohammedi - of non-Muslim girls and women, are all Muslims, not one of them is an atheist, or a Jew, or Christian, or Buddhist, or Hindu or Confucian ; funny, that.- CM) to fight in Syria...

And now, let's restate the obvious.  If there were no Muslims in Australia - not even one - we would not have to worry about nor expensively try to detect, monitor and thwart the recruiters for jihad nor those whom they recruit.  This Muslim man, who has just been killed waging jihad alongside the pious Muslims of Islamic State, in Syria, and who if he had not been killed might have returned here to be a menace to his infidel neighbours, came to Australia from Muslim Afghanistan, around 2000 or 2001.  If from the 1940s right on up to the present day Australia had not admitted even one identifiable/ declared Muslim into the country, can anyone deny that we would not now be having to worry about the likes of Zia Abdul Haq?   But with  500 000 to 600 000 Muslims now entrenched as an Ummah fifth column in our midst, the plots are springing up continually and an ever-increasing stream of pious jihadis are going off to places like Syria to abuse and kill the minority infidels and the wrong-sect or insufficiently-Islamic Muslims, with some of them intending to come back and apply their battlefield experience here, if they can manage it.  Got Muslims? Got Jihad.  - CM

 

 

 

 

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Posted on 10/15/2014 10:35 PM by Christina McIntosh
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Wednesday, 15 October 2014
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Apparently he doesn't agree with the Kuwaiti cleric who thinks those enslaved girls and women were sold to the "Jews of Israel." He thinks they are there for the enjoyment of Muslims, and that this is islamically correct.

One of them must be wrong.

Here.

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Posted on 10/15/2014 8:31 PM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Wednesday, 15 October 2014
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Crazed worldview, Islam-generated, on public display here.

A Shii'ie, he fears and hates ISIS. But what can he say about ISIS that makes it convincingly un-Islamic for its audience? First, that the Americans are not using all of their magicial military might, which allows them apparently even to see through rocks and smoke, which must mean that they don't really want to harm ISIS, but to support it. But even more important, ISIS is said to sell not Yazidis or Christians but, rather, Muslim women and girls, and to sell them not to fellow Muslims (who indeed are the ones snapping up, at bargain prices, those Yazidi women and girls and, for all I know, seized Christian girls too) but, rather, to the Jews of Israel. 

That's why ISIS, in this cleric's view, is so bad.

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Posted on 10/15/2014 8:25 PM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Wednesday, 15 October 2014
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Well, well, well...

US troops and Iraqi police were wounded by exposure to abandoned chemical weapons in 2004-11 in a series of incidents largely kept quiet by the Pentagon, a US newspaper has reported.

The New York Times said the weapons were built by Saddam Hussein's regime during the 1980s Iran-Iraq war.

Soldiers and police uncovered about 5,000 warheads, shells or bombs.

The Times based its report on dozens of pages of classified documents, and interviews with soldiers and officials.

The newspaper tracked down 17 US soldiers and seven Iraqi police officers who said they had been wounded during at least six separate incidents.

Some of the weapons were reportedly designed in the US and manufactured in Europe.

They were filled with chemical agents produced in Iraq from ingredients purchased in some cases in the US.

In a statement to the BBC, Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm John Kirby said Defence Secretary Chuck Hagel was "concerned by any indication or allegation that our troops have not received the care and administrative support they deserve" and had ordered a review of the military's health system and the military awards programme.

"While we cannot speak to individual decisions made by unit commanders or medical staff at the time - or the guidance they may have given their troops about the existence of chemical munitions in Iraq - the defence department made public its discovery of these munitions as far back as 2006 and acknowledged the likelihood that more could be found," Adm Kirby said.

The chemical weapons were produced by Saddam for use against Iranian forces during the Iran-Iraq War of the 1980s.

Saddam's forces also deployed chemical weapons against the Kurdish population in Halabja in eastern Iraq.

Much of Hussein's chemical arsenal was destroyed following the Gulf War of 1991.

But thousands of rounds were buried or secreted away until US troops stumbled upon them after 2003.

Some of the US soldiers' finds were poorly documented.

In some cases, soldiers destroyed the chemical munitions on their own without calling in special teams.

The Pentagon withheld information on the finds, including data on the number of warheads discovered, from the public and from Congress, the paper reported.

Many of the old caches of chemical weapons were discovered around the ruins of the Muthanna State Establishment, described as the centre of Iraqi chemical weapons production in the 1980s.

Since June, the compound has been under the control of the Islamic State militant group.

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Posted on 10/15/2014 6:09 PM by Geoffrey Clarfield
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Wednesday, 15 October 2014
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Richard Sencer writes in the Telegraph via the National Post:

ISIS jihadists have tried to justify seizing thousands of Yazidi women in northern Iraq and offering them to fighters as sex slaves.

When stories of mass murder and enslavement first emerged in August there were suggestions they might be exaggerated.

Now, however, researchers who have talked to survivors and imprisoned women on hidden mobile phones believe that up to 5,000 men may have been shot dead and bulldozed into mass graves, and 7,000 women held in detention centres to be offered as slaves.

Moreover, the Islamic State of Iraq and Al-Sham has not only admitted taking the women, but issued a lengthy theological justification.

“After capture, the Yazidi women and children were then divided according to the Sharia amongst the fighters of the Islamic State,” says a new article in their English-language online magazine Dabiq.

When the jihadists attacked areas occupied by Yazidis, the West’s attention focused on tens of thousands of refugees who crowded the barren hills of nearby Mount Sinjar. But thousands more were captured in nearby villages.

“My 13-year-old sister was separated from my family,” said one man, Ahmed Naif Qasem, who is staying in the town of Ba’adre. His parents, wife and extended family were seized from their home in Snuny, near Sinjar, and taken over the Syrian border to be converted to Islam at gunpoint.

When the family returned, his sister and his wife had been taken away. His wife was later allowed to rejoin her family after having been “treated badly,” but no one had seen his sister since.

What has happened to the women has been relayed in a series of phone calls from families, and in some cases by women and girls who managed to escape.

Bakat Khalaf, 60, another refugee in Ba’adre, said his 13-year-old niece had escaped seven weeks after being “taken away” but had so far been too distressed to describe what had happened to her. “She just cries when she tries to speak,” he said. Others escapers have told of being “married” to older jihadi leaders, in some cases raped, and made to watch acts of barbarity. Such stories have been confirmed by researchers from the United Nations. Matthew Barber, a scholar of Yazidi history at the University of Chicago who was in Kurdistan as the assaults happened, said he had a list of 4,800 names of women and children being held captive.

“In every place where Yazidi women or families are held, jihadists come and randomly select women that they take away,” he added. “A final total above 7,000 is perfectly feasible.”

The town of Tal Afar alone is thought to hold around 3,500 women and children in five detention centres. Others are being held in Mosul.

Much of the ISIS newsletter is devoted to theological justifications for the jihadists’ behaviour, citing the practices of the Prophet Mohammed and his Companions.

The article about the Yazidis, entitled “The Revival of Slavery before the Hour,” says that “well-known” rules are observed, including not separating mothers from their children.

The Dabiq article does not specifically say women are being sold for sex, but it says taking a maid as a concubine helps men avoid the sin of adultery, or of being alone with an unrelated woman. An open letter to ISIS by Islamic scholars last month took them to task over the Yazidis, insisting that: “The reintroduction of slavery is forbidden in Islam. It was abolished by universal consensus.”

The figures for men killed as ISIS took their villages are reminiscent of the Srebrenica massacre in the Bosnian civil war. The UN’s report says 250-300 men were killed in Mr Khalaf’s village, Hardan, including 10 by beheading; another 400 were gunned down in the village of Khocho; another 200 civilians were killed by ISIS shelling them as they left the village of Adnaniya; as another group of refugees reached the village of Qiniyeh, the men were separated from the women and children, and 70 to 90 of them were lined up by a ditch and shot.

On another road, witnesses reported dozens of bodies left behind, including those of four elderly men with disabilities, who had been shot dead.

In some massacres, the bodies were bulldozed into mass graves, survivors told The Daily Telegraph. In others, men were herded into Yazidi temples that were then blown up.

Mr Barber and Kurdish representatives said researchers believed 3-5,000 men had been killed.

The Yazidi religion is an offshoot of Zoroastrianism, and Yazidis are described as “devil-worshippers” by ISIS.

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Posted on 10/15/2014 6:03 PM by Geoffrey Clarfield
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Wednesday, 15 October 2014
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From a news story:

"But in remarks underscoring the region's layered crises, Turkey's Deputy Prime Minister Bulent Arinc mocked the Kurdish fighters defending Kobani, comparing their struggle against the Islamic State group to the guerrilla war of the affiliated Kurdish PKK rebels, who have fought a three-decade insurgency in Turkey, largely in mountainous regions in Turkey's east.

"They are not able to put up a serious fight there," Arinc told reporters in the southeastern city of Adiyaman.

"It is easy to fight on the mountain against the military, police, the teacher and the judge. It is easy to kidnap people, but they are not able to fight in Kobani," he said. "I could say a lot more but let me leave it at that so that they are not embarrassed."

 

 

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Posted on 10/15/2014 5:17 PM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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