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Sunday, 10 May 2009
The Disproportionate Three Per Cent
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‘Four Gurkhas have been killed.’ That’s the last sentence in Esmerelda’s post, here. Roughly speaking that's three per cent of all the British fatalities in Afghanistan. The Royal Gurkha Rifles make up far less than three per cent of the Army so the casualties in the Royal Gurkha Regiment are disproportionate. That is an indication of the average Gurkha soldier's bravery, loyalty and fearless commitment to his Regiment and to the Crown and to the UK – a Regiment whose members have received twenty-six Victoria Crosses since 1911. You will note that no Gurkha has rejected the VC because it is a cross, despite most Gurkhas being either Hindu or Buddhist (for the relevance of that remark please see Esme’s post here).

You can find out about the Royal Gurkha Rifles on this Army web page.
 
It is no small wonder that the most British people support Ms. Lumley’s campaign in support of former Gurkha soldiers’ rights to settle here and to call upon our country for whatever they need. Very few wish to do so – probably fewer than two and a half thousand former members of the Gurkha Rifles wish to come here in order to permanently settle in this country with their dependents (and by no means do all of them have dependents whom they wish to bring to this country, or, for that matter, dependents who wish to come here) – the figure of fifteen hundred is generally accepted – and of one thing, the loyalty of the Gurkhas to the UK and to the Crown, there can be no doubt.
 
The vast majority of Gurkhas take their pensions and go home to live out the remainder of their lives as honoured, and honourable, men in their own communities. That is as it should be. However, we British do not, and must not, forget the debt which we owe to these former soldiers of the Crown – as we should not forget what we owe to any current or former military person. When they ask for help, when the Gurkhas, in this instance, call upon us for assistance, here or in Nepal, we should, we must, give all that is possible. When some few of them ask to be allowed to settle in Britain – to enjoy the fruits of a society which they have come to know and love and which they have served and have been willing to lay down their lives for – it strikes me that it is just a tad churlish of us to refuse. Every Gurkha who has ever served in the Regiment should have the automatic right to settle here if he desires to do so.
 
Our current, treacherous and incompetent Government is, unsurprisingly, completely out of step with popular opinion and sentiment and completely unaware that there still exists a substantial number of British people who, even today, are capable of discerning right from wrong despite that Government’s, typically socialist, increasingly desperate attempts over recent years to destroy any sense of shared morality and identity, any sense of community and citizenship. I am no believer in conspiracy theories but sometimes one has to wonder about governments in Britain, and in Europe, for they do seem to be hell-bent on our destruction and deeply suspicious of anyone who demonstrates loyalty and affection towards their country and their shared European culture.
 
Perhaps, one cannot help but wonder, if the Gurkhas had been believers in Islam rather than in Hinduism and in Buddhism – believers in that fascist ideology which seeks only our destruction, as it seeks the destruction of all decency and morality – then their requests for the right to settle here might have well have been met with much more sympathy in Government circles. We, in Britain, have suffered for many decades from a political elite which has consistently failed to see, not wanted to see, the dangers inherent in Islam. We have a Foreign Office which is staffed by people whose world view is Islamic, a defence strategy based on the idea that the Arab and Islamic part of the world can be trusted (which it cannot be, by very definition – its own definition), a monetary policy that sees absolutely nothing wrong with accepting huge inward investment from super-rich Islamic Arab oil states (enriched at our expense, of course), an immigration policy (not that we need immigration – we don’t) which favours peoples whose only aim is to change us in such ways as will destroy our freedoms and our culture, and an energy policy which places an undue reliance on overseas sources when we have sufficient, currently unexploited, reserves of all types of fossil fuels here on these islands and huge, and as yet to be explored and utilised, reserves of alternative sources of energy, the exploitation of which we all know has to be the way forward if we are to sustain our physical civilisation and our luxurious way of life without destroying our planet.
 
The plight of the Gurkhas vis-a-vis our Government’s stance about them is symptomatic of the deep malaise infecting government in the UK. Our politicians no longer see, they are incapable of seeing, their primary purpose – ruling Britain for the benefit of the British and spending any surplus funds in such a way so as to help others elsewhere. Instead they see only some false and spurious dream of unattainable equality. They actually believe that all men (and women) are equal. Of course, all of us are born equal and we should, in an ideal world, have equal opportunities for development and growth. That we should all end up equal – that government has to level us all to some common point in the interest of fairness and keep us there, force equality upon us – is the stupidity inherent in modern socialist thinking and the men of the Gurkha Regiment are the unwitting victims of that socialist stupidity. Their excellence cannot be allowed; their excellence disproves the very basis on which modern socialism is built; their loyalty to the UK and to the Crown is an insult to the very essence of modern socialism which quite categorically believes in levelling, and in industrial process psychology. Excellence, standing out from the herd, bravery, serving a cause greater than oneself, are not socialist concepts. Conforming to a pre-determined norm, following the herd instinct, doing only what is expected of one, those are the socialist values.
 
Gurkhas are asking for something which socialists are not prepared to give to them because Gurkhas in the Army demonstrate, exactly and definably, why socialism is a bankrupt ideology with no future. They are excellent and they are individuals. Each of them take an oath to the Crown – each of them, that is the key – and as such they are distrusted by our socialist Government in Britain for they remind us, we British citizens by birth and right, each and every one of us, of our obligations and rights as citizens and that is something which no socialist government wants its population to be reminded of.
 
I, with Ms. Lumley, stand with Gurkhas. They have a right to call these dear green islands their home if they want to. And I damn all those who would argue against that stance. ‘Are you British?’ I would ask them. ‘Do you know what freedom is?’ I would ask them. ‘Do you know what generations of these men have done for us?’ I would ask them.
 
And when their stupid stares, their baffled looks of incomprehension, return my questions I would simply say to them, shout at them, as all true and good British men, and women, must:
 
“Three percent! Three percent!”
 
And still they wouldn’t understand! That’s the poison which socialism has injected into our body politic! They have introduced the poison of unreason. They have introduced the poison of petty politics and lexiphanic bombast. More importantly, socialism has persuaded my people that they should hate themselves – that they should be guilty even for allowing the age-old culture of the Gurkhas to help us to defend our, and their, ways of life. How sick is that sort of left-wing guilt?
 
They, the socialist mentors and rulers of our societies today, make words, want words, to mean exactly what they want them to mean – it’s a bit, perhaps a lot, like Lewis Carol’s view of the world, isn’t it?
 
But ‘three percent’! Well, they can’t alter that and they can’t spin those words to mean something different, can they? But just watch – they will. Just watch them do it!
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Posted on 05/10/2009 6:47 AM by John M. Joyce
Comments
10 May 2009
Send an emailMary Jackson

Quite right. Even by Socialist standards, this Government is a disgrace. Gordon Brown thought he could sound tough on immigration and picked people not likely to get violent or even kick up a fuss. (And it isn't the Gurkhas who are, it is the wonderful Joanna Lumley on their behalf, and on behalf of the British people, whose mood Gordon Brown failed to read.)



11 May 2009
Esmerelda Weatherwax

I quite agree.
I was going to make this a separate post, I was cross enough I tried to get on a computer in Tourist Information to do so immediately,  but it fits here. From yesterday's Sunday Mirror.
The widow of a hero Gurkha killed in Afghanistan was told she has no right to stay in Britain – just 24 hours after he was blasted to death by a Taliban suicide bomber.
Still stunned by news that Kumar Pun had given his life for Britain on Thursday, his wife Parbati was told on Friday she and his children could be ordered out of the UK next year.
And even though Kumar, 31, of Dover, loyally served his Queen and Country for 13 years, his wife may not even qualify for an Army widow’s pension.
Kumar, a corporal praised by Army top brass for his bravery and professionalism, joined the Army in 1996 when he was 17.
His father Dhanbahadur Pun, 60, had also served in the Gurkhas and he was born in Hong Kong when Dhanbahadur was stationed there.
In 1999 he wed childhood sweetheart Parbati, but she was not allowed to come to Britain to live with him until 2006, when their daughter Klaudine was three.
They set up home together in Dover, where Parbati, now six, and their second daughter Petrina, 18 months, are settled.
But Parbati’s temporary visa is valid only until September 2010 – at which point she faces having to return to Nepal to apply for British residency, with no guarantee it will be granted by immigration officials.
Klaudine was born in Nepal and Petrina in Brunei, where Kumar was stationed. Neither is a British citizen and their visas also run out next September.
Klaudine, who speaks perfect English, is doing well at a primary school near the family’s three-bedroom terraced home, rented to them by the MoD. The family say she sees Dover as her home.
Meanwhile, it emerged that Parbati may not even be entitled to a war widow’s pension under MoD rules about length of service. A Justice for Gurkhas Campaign military lawyer said Gurkhas needed to serve 15 years alongside British forces to gain their pension. Kumar had served just under 14 when he was killed.
In total, Kumar lived in the UK for eight years and served all over the world, including tours of duty in Bosnia, Sierra Leone, Oman, Kenya and Kosovo. He also had a tour of duty in the Falklands.
But most of his life in the past decade has been based around living in Britain.
Close friend Ram Rai, 36, currently serving with 2nd Battalion, the Royal Gurkha Rifles, said: “He was totally immersed in British culture. He was proud to serve and I know he would have been proud dying for this country doing the job he loved. Kumar loved his football and was just like any other man who had lived all his life in this country. He was a fan of Manchester United and we would often go out for a few beers and watch the football. And he was also very hard-working, always out and about doing something.”
Corporal Ghale added: “He was also such a proud family man. He thought the world of his wife and he adored his two daughters. Kumar was very loyal and you knew he would never break your trust in him. He was very strong, too, and brave. We Gurkhas may be small but we’re tough.”
The Sunday Mirror spoke to Kumar’s family and friends at Parbati’s home for three hours yesterday before MoD officials arrived and asked us to leave.





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