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Monday, 2 October 2006
Atavism
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I despise Proust for no other reason than the fact that every time someone eats an old favorite dinner or dessert, they quote Proust and his Madeleines about conjuring up their childhood.

Nevertheless, I have found myself in the last few months buying fizzy drinks different from the Coke I usually fueled myself with in the late afternoon.

I am buying grape, orange, black cherry sodas for some inexplicable reason. Having grown up in New England, I have always had a soft spot for Birch Beer, a concoction that everyone I have met from England, Germany, or west of Connecticut despise.

Yet, I find myself revisiting the Nehi sodas that Radar in M*A*S*H frequently longed for, but I can now find in my gourmet supermarket today way out West.

I grew up taking my fifteen cent weekly allowance and going to the corner market for a soda and Twinkies. Heaven on Earth.

I admit to feeling atavistic when I drink a bottle of grape soda, but ya know, it tastes really good. It tastes like grape soda and reminds me why I liked it at eight years old.

America was wonderful then. It has a lot wonderful about it still. I wish I had a grandson I could share a grape soda with. That would be heaven again.
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Posted on 10/02/2006 2:23 AM by Mark Butterworth
Comments
2 Oct 2006
Send an emailMary Jackson
Don't get me started on Tizer.

2 Oct 2006
Send an emailEsmerelda Weatherwax
Have you ever tried Irn-Bru?
Don't. Its Scottish and horrible, and even drowned in whiskey I doubt it would be palatable.

2 Oct 2006
Send an emailRobert Bove
And sarsaparilla's fine, too--BUT a New England beverage that's a real challenge for native-born pallets or otherwise is MOXIE.

2 Oct 2006
mark b
Moxie? I had to google it. But I should have known the drink. I certainly grew up with the expression of someone being full of moxie. Those other drinks sound terrible by their names alone.

2 Oct 2006
Send an emailMary Jackson
Dandelion and Burdock.

Vimto

Say no more.



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