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Tuesday, 15 January 2013
The Sectarian And Ethnic Hostilities In Iraq May Well Be "Bad News For Iraq And For The Middle East In General" But It's Good News For Infidels Everywhere
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While Walter Russell Mead notes that a civil war -- hot, cold, or as it now appears, just right -- may be  "bad for Iraq and the [Muslim] Middle East" it's good for the non-Muslims of the world because it weakens, divides, demoralizes, keeps preoccupied, the hideous Camp of Islam. As good, in its way, as the war in Syria -- may that  go on forever --or the Iran-Iraq War, which should have gone on forever, or the war between Nasser's Egypt and the Saudi-backed Royalists in Yemen in the mid-1960s, which did not, unfortrunately, go on nearly long enough, but at least in Yemen, everyone's up in arms again.

From the blog of Walter Russell Mead:

January 15, 2013

Is Civil War About to Return to Iraq?

A Sunni member of Iraq’s parliament was assassinated by a suicide bomber today, just two days after a failed roadside bomb attack, apparently aimed at the finance minister (also Sunni). The AP reports:

The governor of Anbar province, Qassim al-Fahdawi, said that lawmaker Ifan Saadoun was killed when a suicide bomber blew himself up in the restive city of Fallujah.

The attack comes two days after a convoy carrying Iraq’s Sunni finance minister, Rafia al-Issawi, was struck by a bomb as he traveled to the city. Al-Issawi hails from the same tribe and is from the same political bloc as the lawmaker.

This is bad news for Iraq and for the Middle East in general. “Blowing up Sunni MP Ayfan Issawi 2 days after attempt on Finance Min Rafi Issawi suggests someone wants war. Iraq looking very wobbly,” tweeted Washington Post correspondent Liz Sly.

Over the past few weeks tens of thousands of Sunni protestors have been out on the streets of Anbar province and elsewhere to voice anger at Shiite Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, who they say is becoming a dictator and restricting their rights.

Very wobbly indeed. As Henri Barkey wrote for the AI recently, Iraq may ultimately break up into autonomous or independent regions. That would surely not be an entirely peaceful process. With things as tense as they are now, even if the country holds together the near future is likely to be marked by political assassinations, protest campaigns, and even war.

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Posted on 01/15/2013 4:44 PM by Hugh Fitzgerald
Comments
15 Jan 2013
Send an emailjeffrey fixler

 Hugh, you are the most insightful and informed person on the Middle East ever to put pen to paper. You are truly my hero! May you live a 100 years. If only it were you who was formulating ME policy....... Well, I can dream can't I?



16 Jan 2013
Christina McIntosh

 There is one caveat to the proposal that we step back and observe from afar the spectacle of the ummah devouring itself in internecine warfare (and, too, those roiling black holes of Jihad sucking in jihad-minded Mohammedans from the Mohammedan colonies in Infidel lands).

I would be content to stand back, seal the borders and watch, so long as

a/ we were sealing the borders (that is, not allowing into our lands 1/ any Muslims from those lands who flee the strife in order to carry the jihad onto our turf, by swelling the Muslim Fifth Column we've already got and 2/ Muslims who've left our lands, engaged in jihad within dar al Islam, and now - combat-hardened - propose to return here and put what they've learned against the wrong sorts of Muslim, into practice against us Infidels.) 

and so long as

b/ we were finding ways to get the remaining Mandeans and Christians out of Iraq to places of safety within the Lands of the Infidels, and ways to get the remaining Christians out of Syria, also to places of safety in lands governed and dominated by non-Muslims.

The Jews are well out of Yemen (there are maybe 100 + left; but the vast majority of that ancient community were rescued years ago); the Jews escaped from or were driven out of Syria; there are no Jews left in Iraq.  

I can see one, and one role only, for limited and strictly pinpointed non-Muslim intervention in Iraq and Syria.  That is: to help the Christians (and in Iraq, also, the few surviving Mandeans) get out.  An Operation Magic Carpet, an operation On Eagles' Wings, emulating what the Jews of Israel did for their co-religionists, decades ago.  (And there is another community for whom the door of escape and the Gates of Hope need to be opened: the Coptic Christians of Egypt). I would happily send back to Egypt the current Egyptian-born Egyptian-indoctrinated Al Azhar-graduate Mufit of (most of) the Muslims in Australian, if I could only bring in, in his place, lots and lots and lots of devout Coptic Christians.   There are enough nominally-majority-Christian countries in the world, that if we all agreed to take some of the beleaguered, terrorised, mortally-imperilled Copts, Assyrian Christians and Iraqi Christians, none of us would have to take in an impossible number...and we'd all, in the long run, be the richer, especially if, in order to make room for the Copts and Assyrians, we all announced, in concert, that oh so sorry, we just cannot take X thousand Muslim pretend-'refugees' anymore, we are taking the Copts and Assyrians because they are manifestly and imminently in danger of suffering genocide.

And then, once we have our fellow Infidels safely out of immediate harm's way - and people like Mark Durie have begun to assist them with the painful process of shedding their dhimmi conditioning - we get out, and shake ourselves, bit by bit, free of our various entanglements with the denizens of dar al Islam. 



16 Jan 2013
Send an emailjeffrey fixler

 Great comment Christina Mcintosh! May the force be with you.





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