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Recent Publications from New English Review Press
Out Into The Beautiful World
by Theodore Dalrymple
Unreading Shakespeare
by David P. Gontar
Islam Through the Looking Glass: The Collected Essays and Reviews of J. B. Kelly, Vol. 3
edited by S. B. Kelly
The Real Nature of Religion
by Rebecca Bynum
As Far As The Eye Can See
by Moshe Dann
Threats of Pain and Ruin
by Theodore Dalrymple
The Oil Cringe of the West: The Collected Essays and Reviews of J.B. Kelly Vol. 2
edited by S.B. Kelly
The Impact of Islam
by Emmet Scott
Sir Walter Scott's Crusades and Other Fantasies
by Ibn Warraq
Fighting the Retreat from Arabia and the Gulf: The Collected Essays and Reviews of J.B. Kelly. Vol. 1
edited by S.B. Kelly
The Literary Culture of France
by J. E. G. Dixon
Hamlet Made Simple and Other Essays
by David P. Gontar
Farewell Fear
by Theodore Dalrymple
The Eagle and The Bible: Lessons in Liberty from Holy Writ
by Kenneth Hanson
The West Speaks
interviews by Jerry Gordon
Mohammed and Charlemagne Revisited: The History of a Controversy
Emmet Scott
Anything Goes
by Theodore Dalrymple
The Left is Seldom Right
by Norman Berdichevsky
Allah is Dead: Why Islam is Not a Religion
by Rebecca Bynum






















Sunday, 31 May 2015
US Asylum Seekers from Cuba, Africa and South Asia Take Perilous Jungle Crossing in Panama
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Our June NER article, Trojan Horse Federal Refugee Program Brings Jihadi Threat to America: An Interview with Ann Corcoran  noted the increasing numbers of illegal migrants making global treks by air and water to Latin America and the trek north to the US border for asylum. They sought this difficult passage for a variety of reasons; but really one, “to seek a better life”.  Although there may be some among the 3,400 who have undertaken this dangerous long distance passage who may have other reasons in mind. Coincidentally, the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) Weekend Edition had a front page article, focusing on the passage through the Darien jungle of Panama, “Panama's?Perilous?Jungle Is?a New?Route?for?Migrants”.  There are  also costly water passages by human traffickers that avoid the Darien jungle equivalent to those we have written about in the Mediterranean.  However, ike the experience of illegal migrants fleeing Syria, Sub Sahara Africa endeavoring to reach the EU via Libya and other crossing points they may be robbed and murdered by ‘coyotes,’ human traffickers.

 Among those interviewed in the WSJ article were illegal migrants from Guinea, Somalia, Pakistan and Cuba.  Note that common thread is escape from Jihadis; Sharia arranged marriages or tyranny, as in the case of Cuban refugees in this group.  What is also not lost is that all  illegal migrants have prior knowledge, that if they survive the trek north and illegally cross the US southern border, they can present themselves as asylum seekers.  Because of US asylum privileges for Cuban border crossers, they will likely not be detained but released to possible relatives. In other cases, as we have seen, they will  be transported to a  DHS Immigration Customs Enforcement   Detention Center, to await  a hearing before a Justice Department, Executive Office for Immigration Review,  immigration judge.   Before him they will invoke the important words, ‘fear of physical or political threats’ before a quick decision is gaveled down admitting them as a refugee. They will then obtain benefits under the Refugee Act of1980, including community placement, unless they can claim relatives here in the US.  The US Refugee Admissions Program then takes over providing a smorgasbord of welfare, Medicaid, housing assistance and a pathway to ultimate citizenship. All without any reasonable means of screening asylees as documentation may be absent or virtually unavailable from their country of origin.

Watch this WSJ video:

 

Note these WSJ article excerpts.

A Somali:

 Ahmed Hassan staggered through dense Panamanian jungle, crazy with thirst, his rubber sandals sliding in the mud, fearing he would die thousands of miles from his homeland in Somalia.

“I told my family I would go to the U.S., that was the plan,” said the 26-year-old truck driver, who said he fled late last year when al-Shabaab militants took his village. He flew to Brazil and made a cross-continental bus trip to Colombia.

In March came his biggest test: crossing the Darien Gap that connects South America with Panama and Mr. Hassan’s ultimate goal, the U.S.

“There was no water. There were snakes,” he said in a small holding center in Metetí, north of the jungle, gashes and bites covering his legs under his traditional sarong. “I thought I might die in that jungle.”

A Guinean:

There is still the journey through Central America and Mexico, but migrants say the Darien is the hardest. “I want to get to the U.S.,” said Hawa Bah, 20, who fled Guinea in West Africa. She spoke as she lay weak on a cot in a Panamanian holding center after getting lost in the Darien for more than 10 days.

“I was being forced into marriage, and I was worried about Ebola,” she said. “I’d rather have died in the jungle than go back.”

A Cuban Couple:

Yamil Gonzales, a Cuban, staggered up an incline above the beach, wheezing. “Agua,” murmured Mr. Gonzales, 45, collapsing against a tree as companions frantically dug through black garbage bags for water.

Soon, he was plowing through underbrush littered with bottles and broken sandals left by prior processions.

“It’s been hard, really hard,” said his wife, Yalile Alfonso, 47. “But in Cuba, there’s nothing. We had to come this way.” The couple was well-prepared, with passports, detailed plans to take buses to the U.S. border and knowledge of U.S. asylum laws.

A Pakistani:
 

But unlike the jungle route, this approach is close to Colombia, so border authorities can easily deport migrants without passports. That was Mohammed Khan’s fate. A father of four from Swat, a Pakistani area plagued by Taliban violence, he had landed with Mr. Gonzales. Months before, people of his village had pitched in $7,000 for his trip, he said.

A small pack on his back, Mr. Khan, 38, looked elated as he scrambled down the slope toward the tiny town of La Miel. People had told him Panama police would be hospitable.

But he had dumped his passport much earlier. The border authorities shook their heads as he pleaded: “Please, please, help me.” They marched him back up the mountain to Colombia.

Early this month, Mr. Khan texted that he re-entered Panama via the jungle, where he had seen “a lot dead.” He was in Guatemala, waiting to head north.

“Go USA,” he texted. “Plz pray.”

Note the open pathway to the US once access to Panama is obtained:

Critics like Otto Reich, former U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs, have said Ecuador’s open-door stance may result in a threat to the U.S. And Panamanian officials “know they are coming to the U.S. and then once here they will no longer be Panama’s problem,” said Mr. Reich, who heads a government-relations and trade-consulting firm.

Javier Carillo, director of Panama’s National Migration Service, says it is unfair to blame Panama for the problem, since migrants arrive illegally and pass through some nine other countries on their way to the U.S. A spokesman for Colombia’s immigration authority said it combats human smuggling and offers migrants the opportunity to apply for asylum or safe-conduct papers.

Brazil’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs said it “is not aware of this human trafficking route.” Officials at Ecuador’s immigration authority didn’t respond to requests for comment. Ecuador’s Foreign Ministry has said the country doesn’t support criminal activity.

Cubans, who say crossing the Florida Straits has become too tough, are the biggest group flowing across and around the isthmus. Others from far-off countries are also arriving in growing numbers: Panama processed 210 Somalis crossing the Darien this year through March, up from 60 in the year-earlier period.

Where have we heard about the Darien Gap in what is now Panama?  Think of the brief Scottish colony of “Caledonia” established in the 1690 in the Gulf of Darien, that was supposed to conduct trade in both the Atlantic and Pacific. The so-called “Darien Scheme” failed for a host of reasons including poor planning, provisions and being ravaged by epidemics until the colony was overrun by Spanish military in 1700. Because it was backed by upwards of 50 percent of currency in circulation in Scotland, its failure ultimately forced the merger that created the United Kingdom in 1707.

 

 

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Posted on 05/31/2015 3:40 PM by Jerry Gordon
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Sunday, 31 May 2015
That Foolish And Dangerous Man, UN Special Rapporteur Francois Crepeau
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Posted on 05/31/2015 2:55 PM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Sunday, 31 May 2015
For Kerry's Latest Performance On The World Stage
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Even those who deplore his understanding of men and events no doubt wished that his upcoming last-lap performance in Geneva would go well. Merde, in bocca a lupo, break a leg. Kerry has been accused of wanting imagination, of being a literalist. Apparently, it's true.
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Posted on 05/31/2015 12:44 PM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Sunday, 31 May 2015
The Shaving Of Shagpat, And The Re-Taking Of Ramadi
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By now, or tomorrow, or perhaps the day after tomorrow, it will all over, or just about,  "except for the mopping up."

Here.

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Posted on 05/31/2015 12:01 PM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Sunday, 31 May 2015
Foul Play in Soccer
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Soccer is a great sport and the international football competition hosted by the International Federation of Association Football (FIFA), located in Zurich, every four years is the most watched sporting event in the world. The soccer world has now been disgraced and dishonored in two ways, by the inherent corruption among FIFA officials, and by the effort of Palestinians to politicize the organization.

On May 1, 2015 Jibril Rajoub, president of the Palestinian Football Association and deputy secretary of the Fatah Central Committee, announced he would present a resolution on May 29 to the Congress of FIFA. The resolution would call for Israel to be suspended or expelled from FIFA’s governing body. This would mean that Israel would not be able to compete in the Euro qualifiers and its clubs could not participate in European or international competition.

No doubt there have been some minor problems concerning permits for Palestinians to travel. But the whole issue has nothing to do with competitive soccer. It is another missile aimed by Palestinians and their supporters at isolating and vilifying Israel and internationalizing their effort to achieve statehood. It is part of the Palestinian policy of “internationalism,” bringing all alleged grievances of Israel into all international arenas.

A vote to suspend by FIFA has been done only twice before, in the case in the 1960s of apartheid South Africa that had refused to comply with nondiscrimination policies of FIFA, and in the case of Yugoslavia, then led by Slobodan Milosevic, for a short time in May 1992. Israel has not violated any FIFA rules. The result of the suspension would have been that Israel, which is affiliated to the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) could not compete in the 2016 qualifiers, and its clubs would be barred from European competition.

The FIFA President, Sepp Blatter, who has held that position since 1998, was uncharacteristically blunt about the issue, regarding the proposed resolution as an abuse of FIFA statutes. He tried to reach a compromise to avoid a vote. Believing that football has the power to connect people, he wanted to build bridges by proposing a game between the two teams to be played in Zurich, Switzerland.

The Palestinians refused his proposal, reiterating their complaint that Israel was guilty of humiliating treatment of Palestinians by Israeli security and border forces as involves restricted movements of Palestinian players, staff, and officials between the West Bank and Gaza as well as for those travelling to international matches. They had other complaints. Another was FIFA had hindered the establishment of Palestinian  soccer clubs in East Jerusalem by refusing permits for visits of foreign delegations. A third is that Israel limits the import of sports equipment into Palestinian territories.

The most serious Palestinian argument was that five teams in the Israeli Football Association based in the settlements should be expelled from the league.

The Israeli position, stated by IFA President Ofer Eini, was that the restrictions on movement were needed for security reasons. The Israel FA has no influence over them and had nothing to do with them. The Israelis in 2015 have in fact approved 95% of the requests for travel permits. Nevertheless, Rajoub declared that Israeli “security should not be used …as a tool in order to keep this racist, apartheid policies.”

At the FIFA Congress on May 29, 2015 pro-Palestinian demonstrators, chanting “Israel out” disrupted the meeting. Nevertheless, at the last minute Rajoub withdrew the motion to suspend Israel, “at any rate for the present,” explaining that this “did not mean that I give up the resistance.”

The central factor in the whole issue is that Rajoub has been more concerned with political strategy than with sport. At the age of 17 he threw a grenade at an Israeli truck near Hebron, and was imprisoned for 18 years. He was one of the 1150 Palestinian prisoners released in the deal on May 21, 1985 for the three Israeli soldiers held by the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine. Since 2009 he has been deputy secretary of the Fatah Central Committee and has made belligerent statements. He refers to Israelis as “the new Nazis,” and still calls for resistance “in the occupied territories in order to bring an end to the occupation using all forms of resistance. One of his reported remarks was, “I swear that if we had a nuke, we’d have used it this very morning.”

Rajoub has joined in the anti-Israeli, and indeed anti-Semitic charade that the situation in the West Bank was far worse than the apartheid that existed in South Africa. His political decision in August 13, 2014 is “using all forms of resistance in the occupied territories in order to bring an end to the occupation.” Under no circumstances, Rajoub stated on May 17, 2012 will “there be normalization” with Israel.  

The Palestinian threat has been a minor part of the storm and devastating blow to the soccer world. FIFA is facing two criminal investigations. On May 26, 2015 Swiss police arrested seven FIFA officials, including three present or past vice presidents, at the request of the U.S. They now face extradition. The U.S. Department of Justice, by U.S. law, has authority to indict foreign nationals living abroad, an authority that has been used in cases of international terrorism. Switzerland will start an inquiry, a criminal probe concerning criminal mismanagement and money laundering, about the selection of Russia (for 2018) and Qatar (for 2022) to host World Cup competitions.

At the same time the U.S. Department of Justice drew up a 47 count, 161-page indictment against 9 current or former FIFA officials and five others, and mentioned 25 other co-conspirators in a federal court in Brooklyn. The indictment involves $150 million in bribes and kickbacks, dating back to 1991, given to FIFA officials in exchange for commercial rights to soccer tournaments. Federal prosecutors will begin criminal proceedings, for criminal mismanagement and money laundering concerning FIFA’s awarding of the World Cups to Russia in 2018 and to Qatar in 2022. The choice of Qatar, questionable because of its political system and its temperature over 100 degrees in summer, raised obvious questions.

Among the sponsors of FIFA are Adidas, McDonald’s, Budweiser, Coca Cola, Gazprom, and Visa. Those commercial enterprises likely will refuse to be tarnished any longer by association with a corrupt organization. Nor are they likely to have approved the use of FIFA for Palestinian political objectives. Like every lover and supporter of soccer, they will welcome the decision of Rajoub to drop the bid to suspend Israel from FIFA. Play ball is better than foul play.

First published in the American Thinker.

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Posted on 05/31/2015 11:21 AM by Michael Curtis
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Sunday, 31 May 2015
A Musical Interlude: Egyptian Ella (Ted Lewis Orch.)
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Listen here.
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Posted on 05/31/2015 8:58 AM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Sunday, 31 May 2015
Introducing (One More Time) Taha Husain
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Or "Hussein." Or "Husayn." Whateverly.

Here.

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Posted on 05/31/2015 8:55 AM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Sunday, 31 May 2015
More Evidence that Training and Arming Muslims is a Bad Idea
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Washington Times:

A fighter with the Islamic State group in a new online video was trained in counterterrorism tactics in the U.S., the State Department confirmed.

Col. Gulmurod Khalimov, a former police commander from Tajikistan, is shown in black garb worn by the Islamic State group and holding a sniper rifle and a bandolier of ammunition in the terror group’s new video. He claims that he participated in training programs on U.S. soil three times, one of which was in Louisiana, CNNreported Friday.

“From 2003-2014 Colonel Khalimov participated in five counterterrorism training courses in the United States and in Tajikistan, through the Department of State’s Diplomatic Security/Anti-Terrorism Assistance program,” Pooja Jhunjhunwala, a spokeswoman for the State Department, told CNN.

Now Mr. Khalimov has joined the very kind of terrorists he was trained to fight.

The State Department said Mr. Khalimov was trained in crisis response, tactical management of special events, tactical leadership training and related issues, CNN reported.

Experts say Mr. Khalimov’s counterterrorism experience will give him a major advantage against U.S. forces.

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Posted on 05/31/2015 8:15 AM by Rebecca Bynum
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Sunday, 31 May 2015
Egyptian Historian Maged Farag: Egypt Should Drop The "Palestinian" Cause
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A remarkable appearance, showing an Egyptian of note expressing, with complete lucidity, the reasons why Egypt has lost so much in joining in the pan-Muslim (and pan-Arab) cause of the "Palestinians," over the past 70 years, and why it now has everything to gain from closer and friendly relations with Israel.

Maged Farag, Al-Sisi, and others like them share the view first expressed in the 1920s by Taha Husain, the celebrated Egyptian scholar, who insisted that only through emphasizing Egypt itself, Egyptian identity, Egyptian history, including its pre-Islamic and non-Islamic aspects  -- could Egypt save itself from the distempers of the world of Arab (and other) Islam. He called this "Pharaonism." And it was clearly an allternative to both the Islam of the Ikhwan and Hasan Al-Banna (and Mohamed Morsi), and the pan-Arabism of Nasser who, though secular, wanted to be the leader of the Arab camp and thus, in throwing in his lot with pan-Arabism, necessarily had to embrace the "Palestinian" cause. The resulting loss in June 1967 hastened his death, and diminished Egypt.

Among intelligent Egyptians, worried about their country, Taha Husain's views have great appeal. And, not least, because they make perfect sense.

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Posted on 05/31/2015 8:05 AM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Sunday, 31 May 2015
Tatyana Navka And Marat Basharov: Tango On Ice
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Remember: they are dancing the tango on ice. Icy perfection is the theme.

Here.

 

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Posted on 05/31/2015 7:41 AM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Sunday, 31 May 2015
No, But It Will Help
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Headline: Tunisia PM: Destroying boats used by smugglers won't stop flow of migrants to Europe

Of course, what the Arabs in North Africa want is lots and lots of Western aid. You know -- the bottomless pit of ending "poverty" and other "root causes" of that migrant flow. But since the poverty of the Muslim and sub-Saharan Africa is forever, and since these peoples continue to have families with eight, ten, fifteen children apiece (just look at the population figures, since 1920, of the Arab states, and compare, for example, the ten-fold increase in Iraq's population, with the steady state of indigenous populations in France, the United Kingdom, Italy). and is the result of a cultural incapacity which, in the case of Muslim migrants, has everything to do with Islam and the ways it stunts mental growth, discourages free inquiry, punishes "bida" (new ways of doing things), and encourages the habit of mental submission, until Islam's power is diminished -- and when will that be? -- there will always be these attempts to migrate to the advanced, well-run, and much-too-generous West, that should close its doors to such disruptive, expensive, and dangerous immigrants, whose unwelcome presence is steadily degrading in so many ways, recognized and unrecognized, the lives of the indigenous non-Muslim peoples of Europe.

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Posted on 05/31/2015 7:16 AM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Sunday, 31 May 2015
An Ayatollah's Daughter Who Has Slipped Her Mental Traces
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A story, told possibly a bit too breathlessly, of an Ayatollah's daughter who has -- it isn't stated but you and I know -- had her fill of Islam, and become familiar, living in the West, of a wider world, and as part of her self-enlightenment, has come to see that Persians and Jews, the odd men out in the Sunni Arab world, need not be at daggers drawn. But that, of course, depends on the Persians being more Persian, and less Muslim.
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Posted on 05/31/2015 7:11 AM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Saturday, 30 May 2015
Should we be concerned about the latest Anthrax Release?
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US Army Dugway, Utah  Proving Ground

The abrupt news that live anthrax samples  had been shipped from the US Army Dugway proving ground  to  laboratories in the US, an air base in South Korea and possibly Australia came as a reminder to Americans and the world that biological warfare  training exercises might lead to troubling inadvertent releases. Fortunately, 22 military personnel exposed at the south Korean  airbase are being treated with the antibiotic Cipro.  However, this latest release of a BW agent has caused both the US Army bio-warfare directorate and the CDC to review safety precautions, packaging and procedures for the transmission of possible live anthrax spores and why samples had not been made inert?

picture of microscopic anthrax spores

Source: Reuters

The BBC reported that the US military has ordered a review of how it handles anthrax after discovering more cases of live samples being accidentally sent to labs:

Live anthrax samples were believed to have been sent to a total of 24 labs, in 11 US states as well as South Korea and Australia, the Pentagon said.

The Pentagon says that there is no known risk to the general public.

Experts in bio-safety have heavily criticized the lapse and called for improved precautions.

Symptoms of anthrax exposure include skin ulcers, nausea, vomiting and fever, and can cause death if untreated.

News of the live shipments first emerged on Wednesday, as the US said it had accidentally shipped live anthrax spores from Utah to labs in Texas, Maryland, Wisconsin, Delaware, New Jersey, Tennessee, New York, California and Virginia, as well as an air base in South Korea.

Those shipments took place between March 2014 and April 2015, a US official said, according to Reuters.

On Friday, the Department of Defense said it had identified "additional inadvertent live anthrax shipments", including a suspect sample sent to Australia from a batch of anthrax from 2008.

It is not clear when that sample was shipped to Australia.

The military has ordered all of its labs that have previously received inactive anthrax samples to test them. In addition it is advising all labs to cease working with these samples until told otherwise.

Shortly after 9/11, the American public concern over bio-terrorism was raised  by the release of Anthrax in powdered form in letters sent to members of Congress and randomly to private persons.  22 persons were sickened, 5 died, the US Senate building was shut down and inspected.  Anthrax exists naturally, but more powerful variants have been developed synthetically by dual use laboratories in rogue states like Iran, North Korea and Assad’s Syria.  Bio-warfare laboratories have been established by Al Qaeda and ISIS has been rumored to have obtained access to materials in Syria, as well.  Remember the arrest in Afghanistan, prosecution and conviction in the US of Brandeis University and MIT trained scientist, “Lady Al Qaeda”, Aafia Siddiqui .  There is also evidence that Iran’s terrorist proxy, Hezbollah may have been transferred BW capabilities and agents  by Syria that could be deployed against America’s ally , Israel and globally through major transportation nodes in Europe.

Dr. Jill Bellamy

We asked Dr. Jill Bellamy, noted expert on biological warfare and threat reduction about this latest incident.  We have published articles by Dr. Bellamy on Syrian, Hezbollah, Al Qaeda and Iranian BW programs in both the NER and our blog the Iconoclast.

She commented:

Clearly from a bio-safety perspective this is a very serious breach of protocol and demands a full and transparent investigation. As anyone who works with inactivated anthrax would be routinely vaccinated with AVA, exposure from a clinical perspective is probably not as much of a concern as the general public may believe. Of course if anyone outside military labs the live anthrax was sent to and persons who have not been routinely vaccinated were exposed, this would be concerning. I would worry about the time frame from exposure. It appears from the reports that we are talking about several weeks or months during which the anthrax was shipped. It is probably a good sign that none of the labs has reported a laboratory acquired disease or LAD. If exposure is known Cipro (ciprofloxacin hydrochloride) is given for inhalation anthrax and usually a 60 day course is advised. The lab workers in these labs  would surely  have all been vaccinated, so how much of a health risk it poses is debatable. 

 

The bio-safety side is more worrying. CDC and a number of other labs have previously had exposures from the accidental handling of live anthrax. There are very stringent regulations in place for the shipping and transport of live agents. It is doubtful there was any risk to public health during the transport as this would be handled by the military. What is more problematic is that the research done  at US Army labs and Dugway proving ground  are critical to national security.  Incidents like this feed an uninformed section in non-proliferation circles who then call for the closing of these labs or hype the danger they pose to the general public. It makes it more difficult to assure the public that such labs are a vital aspect to protecting citizens from BW attacks and ensuring vaccines and therapeutic countermeasures are available and stockpiled in the event of a deliberate attack. Hopefully this is an incident we will learn a great deal from in terms of bio-safety training, protocols and bio-security.

 

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Posted on 05/30/2015 3:20 PM by jerry Gordon and Jill Bellamy
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Saturday, 30 May 2015
Victory in Europe, 1945 by András Mezei
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translated from the Hungarian & edited by Thomas Ország-Land (June 2015)


 

1

MEMORIES

?

Like burnt grass, my life endures

after the hunger, strife and terror –

The sword, the pestilence retreat

though I remember... I remember.  more>>>

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Posted on 05/30/2015 2:17 PM by NER
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Saturday, 30 May 2015
Another Tree
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by Bibhu Padhi (June 2015)


Look at the trees

and smile;

leave each tree

alone, all to itself.  more>>>

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Posted on 05/30/2015 2:11 PM by NER
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Saturday, 30 May 2015
Alright Already, We Get The Picture -- They Have What It Takes Every Which Way
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Except, of course, in making their case and in negotiating agreements with the Arabs. But in the life-as-it-is-lived aspect, all of their advances, heralded and unheralded, in so many different areas, continue to astonish.  Are you sure there are just seven million people in the country, and not 70 million?

Here's the water story --one more tale of Israeli success (there are so many).

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Posted on 05/30/2015 2:09 PM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Saturday, 30 May 2015
Swimmers On The Eisbach
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by William Ruleman (June 2015)


(Munich, Englischer Garten, 8 June 2014)

 

You let yourself be swept upon

Time’s swirling stream

In couples, pairs, or all alone

As in a dream;  more>>>

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Posted on 05/30/2015 2:07 PM by NER
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Saturday, 30 May 2015
The Voyage
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by David P. Gontar (June 2015)


The three rows of tarnished gas lamps were already roaring at the dock when she arrived. Clouds of ephemeral insects twitched and chittered in the ochre conflagration, restless for extinction. Akira was nowhere in sight. Maybe they wouldn’t rendezvous after all. By the water’s edge a few dinghies sloshed about, each emblazoned with the grotesque face of a clown, green, red, and blue. What sort of child would laugh at these pathetic expressions?  more>>>

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Posted on 05/30/2015 2:01 PM by NER
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Saturday, 30 May 2015
Skepticism About Single-Winner Prizes
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by Richard Kostelanetz (June 2015)


My opinion of the practice of giving a medal to any poet over the age of ten is not high.
— Northrop Frye, The Bush Garden (1971)

Randall Jarrell spoke a half-century ago of the Age of Criticism; I've written about the concluding decades of the 20th Century as the Age of Grants. Now that our National Endowment for the Arts is scarcely funding individuals, we have entered the Age of Prizes, with every institution in sight offering them and everyone over the age of ten asked to desire them (especially if the aspirants can pay enough entry fees to finance the reward).  more>>>

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Posted on 05/30/2015 1:54 PM by NER
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Saturday, 30 May 2015
Agitprop On The Internet
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Here.

The names thought up and distributed to the bloogers are imaginative: koka-kola23, green_margo and Funornotfun.

That could be a party game: think up the best bloggers' names in the service of some world power: Islamic State, China, the United States, Google, Facebook, Amazon.

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Posted on 05/30/2015 1:24 PM by Hugh Fitzgerald
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Saturday, 30 May 2015
The Sick and the Well: Playing at Life in "Daisy Miller"
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by Janet Tassel (June 2015)


Even after more than a century, Henry James's 1878 story, "Daisy Miller," retains its central problem: How to respond to Daisy, with pity or contempt? In the New York preface of 1907, where James refers to the story as his "bantling," he calls Daisy "an object scant and superficially vulgar—from which, however, a sufficiently brooding tenderness might eventually extract a shy incongruous charm." Later in the preface, a friend scoldingly asks him why he has "not only led our judgement of it astray, but made any judgement quite impossible?"  more>>>

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Posted on 05/30/2015 1:47 PM by NER
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Saturday, 30 May 2015
Mea Culpa, Dos: A Reconsideration of John Dos Passos
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by Samuel Hux (June 2015)


Almost forty years ago I reviewed John Dos Passos’s last (and posthumously published) novel, Century’s Ebb, which was subtitled The Thirteenth Chronicle. In the 1950s Dos Passos began arranging retrospectively his novels as “Contemporary Chronicles”—with Chosen Country (1951) as the first, the trilogy U.S.A. falling fourth, fifth, and sixth, Midcentury (1961) as number 12. Century’s Ebb rounds out the story of Jay Pignatelli, who was the hero of the first chronicle and a thinly disguised John Dos Passos. I doubted that it could alter the reputation of Dos Passos, writing that “the critical credit of his novels of the Twenties and Thirties rises and falls, but it is still those novels one thinks of. In literary conversation ‘Dos Passos’ still means Three Soldiers, U.S.A., perhaps Adventures of a Young Man, not The Grand Design or Most Likely to Succeed or even Midcentury—the latter clearly intended in method and substance to rival U.S.A”—which remains pretty much the case now forty years later.  more>>>

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Posted on 05/30/2015 1:41 PM by NER
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Saturday, 30 May 2015
Atheism as a Value System
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by Ankur Betageri (June 2015)


We atheists, children of reason and science, have been judged harshly and unfairly. We have been seen as monsters and brutes: as coldblooded unemotional psychopaths out to destroy the wise, dreamy and intuitive landscapes of faith. As a child this is exactly how I saw atheists in relation to religion. I saw atheists as defilers of the sacred. Growing up in Basavanagudi, that stronghold of ancient tradition and faith of cosmopolitan Bangalore, this was natural. Even now the remembered image of aarti –flames lighting up the contorted bronze figure of Hanuman in that dim-lit temple in Gandhi Bazaar fills my mind with astonishment and awe.  more>>>

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Posted on 05/30/2015 1:36 PM by NER
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Saturday, 30 May 2015
SoHo Zuked Again & Me Exploited
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by Richard Kostelanetz (June 2015)


Since Rutgers University Press has recently published a “25th Anniversary Edition” of Sharon Zukin’s Loft Living: Culture and Capital in Urban Change, I want first to recycle (from this periodical) my earlier review of the 1989 paperback reprint, also from Rutgers University Press, that acknowledges only on its copyright page an earlier 1982 “cloth” edition from Johns Hopkins University Press. (Apparently, its seven years in print don’t count within the 25.) No dates appear in either of this new book’s two prefaces or in the “Postscript to the Paperback Edition.” The back cover from 1989 says that Zukin teaches “urban sociology and urban political economy at Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.” Later, she became the Broeklundian Professor of Sociology. Also bear in mind that I authored The Rise and Fall of Artists’ SoHo (Routledge, 2003) which I’ve rewritten as Artists’ SoHo (Fordham University Press, 2015) and that my earlier review was privately circulated as well.  more>>>

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Posted on 05/30/2015 1:32 PM by NER
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Saturday, 30 May 2015
The Oslo Abomination: Israel’s Socialist Peacemakers
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by Sha’i ben-Tekoa  (June 2015)


One benefit of the bloody fiasco that became the Oslo Peace Process launched on the White House lawn on September 13, 1993 by President of the United States William Jefferson Clinton, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak ben-Nehemiah Rabin, Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon ben-Yitzhak Peres and the world’s most successful terrorist Yasir ibn Abdel Rauf al-Qudwa Arafat and his aide Dr. Mahmoud Abbas, PhD, was how it provided fresh evidence that the Jews are indeed a chosen people -- if not in the traditional, religious sense.  more>>>

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Posted on 05/30/2015 1:27 PM by NER
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