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Wednesday, 13 January 2016
Germany’s Merkel Faces a Firestorm of Criticism over Muslim Migrant Misogyny
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Source: Gatestone Institute

Geert Wilders, Leader of the Dutch Freedom Party (PVV) and PVV Parliamentarian Machiel de Graff introduced a new Arabic term epitomizing the vicious misogyny of Sharia culture, taharrush, in an Op Ed in the Dutch daily, The Post reprinted by The Gatestone Institute, “Give Women the rights to protect themselves.”   The term taharrush represents a permissive form of male  group sexual assault that we  first saw in the virtual rape of South African  CBS 60Minutes correspondent Lara Larson surrounded by a crowd of 200 men in Cairo’s Tahrir  Square in the heady days of the Arab Spring in February 2011. 

Wilders and de Graff in The Post op ed explain the Sharia underpinnings of this barbaric practice:

Taharrush is the Arabic word for the phenomenon whereby women are encircled by groups of men and sexually harassed, assaulted, groped, and raped. After the Cologne taharrush on New Year's Eve, many German women bought pepper spray. Who can blame them?

A culture that has a specific word for sexual assaults of women by groups of men is a danger to all women. The existence of the word indicates that the phenomenon is widespread. Frau Merkel, Prime Minister Rutte and all the other open-door politicians could and should have known this.

The Islamic world is steeped in misogyny. The Koran explicitly states that a woman is worth only half a man (Suras 2: 228, 2: 282, 4:11), that women are unclean (5:6), and that a man can have sex with his wife whenever he wants (24:31). The Koran even says that men are allowed to have sex slaves (4:24), and that they have the right to rape women whom they have captured (24:31).

The hadiths, the descriptions of the life of Muhammad, the ideal human being whose example all the Islamic faithful must follow, confirm that women are sex objects, that they are inferior beings like dogs and donkeys, and that there is nothing wrong with sexual slavery and raping female prisoners.

Taharrush is quite common in Islamic countries. Women are frequently surrounded by men and subsequently abused. The Egyptian website Jadaliyya points out that it also happens to veiled women. Women are victims simply because they are women and not because they have provoked the men by their conduct or "provocative" clothing. It can happen in the streets, public transport, supermarkets, or during protest demonstrations.